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Open AccessArticle

The Possibility of Applying the Vitamin D Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire as a Tool for a Country with No Vitamin D Data in Food Composition Tables

1
Department of Dietetics, Faculty of Human Nutrition and Consumer Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (SGGW-WULS), 159c Nowoursynowska Str., 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
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Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, 12 Kišpatićeva Str., 10-000 Zagreb, Croatia
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Department of Organization and Consumption Economics, Faculty of Human Nutrition and Consumer Sciences, Warsaw University of Life Sciences (WULS-SGGW), 159c Nowoursynowska Str., 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
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Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Centre, 12 Kišpatićeva Str., 10-000 Zagreb, Croatia
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Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, 3 Šalata Str., 10-000 Zagreb, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1278; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091278
Received: 8 August 2018 / Revised: 4 September 2018 / Accepted: 6 September 2018 / Published: 10 September 2018
Although the role of vitamin D is well known, the possibility of assessing its intake may be constricted in countries with no vitamin D data in food composition tables, as in the case of Croatia. The aim of the presented study was to adjust the VIDEO-FFQ (Vitamin D Estimation Only—Food Frequency Questionnaire), previously validated in Poland, to the Croatian population and to assess the validity and reproducibility of the adjusted Cro-VIDEO-FFQ (Croatian—VIDEO-FFQ). The study involved a group of Croatian women aged 20–30 and the Polish questionnaire was adjusted for a population due to similarities of the nutritional habits between countries. 106 individuals were recruited and 63 completed all the stages of the study. Participants conducted a 3-day dietary record and filled out the Cro-VIDEO-FFQ1 (first stage), as well as the same questionnaire (Cro-VIDEO-FFQ2) 6 weeks after (second stage). The following vitamin D intakes were observed in the studied group: 1.9 µg (0.2–8.0 µg) for 3-day dietary record, 3.3 µg (1.1–10.6 µg) for Cro-VIDEO-FFQ1, 3.6 µg (1.4–7.8 µg) for Cro-VIDEO-FFQ2. The Bland-Altman indexes in assessment of validity and reproducibility were 4.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with mean differences of 0.55 µg and 0.12 µg, as well as limits of agreement −0.91–2.01 µg and −0.44–0.69 µg. The kappa coefficient indicated a fair agreement for validity (0.21) and substantial for reproducibility (0.62), while correlations were significant (p = 0.0027, r = 0.37 for validity; p < 0.0001, r = 0.80 for reproducibility). It was observed that VIDEO-FFQ may be adjusted as a simple tool to assess vitamin D intake in a population with no vitamin D data in food composition tables, while Cro-VIDEO-FFQ may be a valid tool for nutritional assessment in Croatia. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin D; food frequency questionnaire; intake assessment; validation study; validity; reproducibility; VIDEO-FFQ vitamin D; food frequency questionnaire; intake assessment; validation study; validity; reproducibility; VIDEO-FFQ
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Głąbska, D.; Uroić, V.; Guzek, D.; Pavić, E.; Bival, S.; Jaworska, K.; Giljević, Z.; Lange, E. The Possibility of Applying the Vitamin D Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire as a Tool for a Country with No Vitamin D Data in Food Composition Tables. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1278.

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