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Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1266; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091266

The Dirt on Clean Eating: A Cross Sectional Analysis of Dietary Intake, Restrained Eating and Opinions about Clean Eating among Women

1
Nutrition and Dietetics, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
2
Health and Exercise Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
3
SHAPE Research Centre, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
4
Flinders Centre for Innovation in Cancer, Flinders Drive, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 August 2018 / Revised: 29 August 2018 / Accepted: 2 September 2018 / Published: 8 September 2018
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Abstract

Clean eating is understood in broad terms to be an approach to eating which promotes the exclusion of processed foods. Social media and websites which promote clean eating are becoming increasingly popular as sources of nutrition information. Currently, there is a lack of knowledge regarding women’s opinions about clean eating sites and their influence on eating behaviour. The aim of the present study was to investigate differences in dietary intake, dietary restraint and opinions about clean eating between women who had, and women who had never adhered to dietary advice from clean eating sites. Using a cross-sectional survey design, women (n = 762) ranging in age from 17–55 completed a self-report questionnaire on eating behaviour and beliefs about clean eating. Findings showed that 25.5% of the sample adhered to dietary advice from a clean eating site sometimes, often or very often. A significantly higher proportion of women who had adhered to dietary advice from clean eating sites met dietary guidelines for the consumption of fruit, meats and alternatives compared to women who had seldom or never adhered. Adherers also had significantly higher levels of restrained eating and were more positive about clean eating in general in comparison to those who seldom or never adhered. Results provide new information about exposure to clean eating sites and how they may influence women’s eating practices. These preliminary findings suggest additional studies are required to better understand the influence of clean eating sites, particularly with regard to whether the information on such sites are from reputable sources and to what degree their recommendations may be problematic for individuals with eating concerns. View Full-Text
Keywords: clean eating; women; social networking sites; internet; dietary restraint; dietary intake clean eating; women; social networking sites; internet; dietary restraint; dietary intake
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Allen, M.; Dickinson, K.M.; Prichard, I. The Dirt on Clean Eating: A Cross Sectional Analysis of Dietary Intake, Restrained Eating and Opinions about Clean Eating among Women. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1266.

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