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Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 988; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10080988

The Potential of Gut Commensals in Reinforcing Intestinal Barrier Function and Alleviating Inflammation

1
Immunobiology Research Program, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, 00290 Helsinki, Finland
2
Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, 00290 Helsinki, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 July 2018 / Revised: 19 July 2018 / Accepted: 27 July 2018 / Published: 29 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet as Means for studying gut-related Inflammation)
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Abstract

The intestinal microbiota, composed of pro- and anti-inflammatory microbes, has an essential role in maintaining gut homeostasis and functionality. An overly hygienic lifestyle, consumption of processed and fiber-poor foods, or antibiotics are major factors modulating the microbiota and possibly leading to longstanding dysbiosis. Dysbiotic microbiota is characterized to have altered composition, reduced diversity and stability, as well as increased levels of lipopolysaccharide-containing, proinflammatory bacteria. Specific commensal species as novel probiotics, so-called next-generation probiotics, could restore the intestinal health by means of attenuating inflammation and strengthening the epithelial barrier. In this review we summarize the latest findings considering the beneficial effects of the promising commensals across all major intestinal phyla. These include the already well-known bifidobacteria, which use extracellular structures or secreted substances to promote intestinal health. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Roseburia intestinalis, and Eubacterium hallii metabolize dietary fibers as major short-chain fatty acid producers providing energy sources for enterocytes and achieving anti-inflammatory effects in the gut. Akkermansia muciniphila exerts beneficial action in metabolic diseases and fortifies the barrier function. The health-promoting effects of Bacteroides species are relatively recently discovered with the findings of excreted immunomodulatory molecules. These promising, unconventional probiotics could be a part of biotherapeutic strategies in the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: commensal bacteria; intestinal health; next generation probiotics; dysbiosis; intestinal permeability; butyrate producing bacteria; anti-inflammatory commensal bacteria; intestinal health; next generation probiotics; dysbiosis; intestinal permeability; butyrate producing bacteria; anti-inflammatory
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Hiippala, K.; Jouhten, H.; Ronkainen, A.; Hartikainen, A.; Kainulainen, V.; Jalanka, J.; Satokari, R. The Potential of Gut Commensals in Reinforcing Intestinal Barrier Function and Alleviating Inflammation. Nutrients 2018, 10, 988.

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