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Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 936; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070936

Calcium and Phosphate Metabolism, Blood Lipids and Intestinal Sterols in Human Intervention Studies Using Different Sources of Phosphate as Supplements—Pooled Results and Literature Search

1
Institute of Nutritional Sciences, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Dornburger Straße 24, 07743 Jena, Germany
2
Institute of General Practice and Family Medicine, Jena University Hospital, Bachstraße 18, 07743 Jena, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 June 2018 / Revised: 18 July 2018 / Accepted: 19 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract

Phosphates are associated with negative physiological effects. The objectives of this publication were to compare differential effects of supplementation with calcium phosphate or phosphate alone in healthy humans. Four adult human studies were conducted with pentacalcium hydroxy-trisphosphate supplementation (CaP; 90 subjects) and their data were pooled for assessment. For literature search; PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge were used and 21 items were assigned to three main topics. The pooled study results show that following CaP supplementation, faecal calcium and phosphorus and urinary calcium were increased, blood lipids were positively modulated, and faecal bile acids were increased, as compared with placebo. The literature search reveals that following calcium phosphate supplementation, urinary calcium was increased. Following solely phosphate supplementation, urinary phosphorus was increased and urinary calcium was decreased. Postprandial calcium concentrations were increased following calcium phosphate supplementation. Postprandial phosphate concentrations were increased following solely phosphate supplementation. Calcium phosphate supplementation resulted in rather positively modulated blood lipids and gut-related parameters. The presented results show the relevance to distinguish between calcium phosphate and solely phosphate supplementations, and the importance of a balanced calcium and phosphorus intake. View Full-Text
Keywords: calcium phosphate supplementation; phosphate supplementation; calcium-phosphate complexes; humans; bile acids; blood lipids; mineral metabolism calcium phosphate supplementation; phosphate supplementation; calcium-phosphate complexes; humans; bile acids; blood lipids; mineral metabolism
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Trautvetter, U.; Ditscheid, B.; Jahreis, G.; Glei, M. Calcium and Phosphate Metabolism, Blood Lipids and Intestinal Sterols in Human Intervention Studies Using Different Sources of Phosphate as Supplements—Pooled Results and Literature Search. Nutrients 2018, 10, 936.

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