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Open AccessArticle

Effectiveness of a Locally Produced, Fish-Based Food Product on Weight Gain among Cambodian Children in the Treatment of Acute Malnutrition: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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Department of Nutrition, Exercise, and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 26, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
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Department of Fisheries Post-Harvest Technologies and Quality Control, Fisheries Administration, 186 Preah Norodom Boulevard, Phnom Penh 12101, Cambodia
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United Nations Children’s Fund Cambodia, Department of Child Survival and Development, 19 & 20, Street 106, Exchange Square Building, Phnom Penh 12101, Cambodia
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National Nutrition Program, Ministry of Health, 31A Rue de France (St. 47), Phnom Penh 12202, Cambodia
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UMR-204, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, IRD/Université de Montpellier/SupAgro, 911, avenue d’Agropolis, 34394 CEDEX 5 Montpellier, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 909; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070909
Received: 5 June 2018 / Revised: 6 July 2018 / Accepted: 13 July 2018 / Published: 16 July 2018
Cambodia continues to have a high prevalence of acute malnutrition. Low acceptability has been found for standard ready-to-use-therapeutic-food (RUTF) products. Therefore, NumTrey, a locally-produced fish-based RUTF, was developed. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of NumTrey compared to an imported milk-based RUTF for weight gain among children aged 6–59 months in the home-treatment for acute malnutrition. Effectiveness was tested in a single-blinded randomized controlled trial with weight gain as the primary outcome. Anthropometry was assessed at baseline and bi-weekly follow-ups until endline at Week 8. In total, 121 patients were randomized into BP-100TM (n = 61) or NumTrey (n = 60). There was no statistical difference in mean weight gain between the groups (1.06 g/kg/day; 95% CI (0.72, 1.41) and 1.08 g/kg/day; 95% CI (0.75, 1.41) for BP-100™ and NumTrey, respectively). In addition, no statistically significant differences in secondary outcomes were found. Although the ability to draw conclusions was limited by lower weight gain than the desired 4 g/kg/day in both groups, no superiority was found for eitherRUTF. A locally produced RUTF is highly relevant to improve nutrition interventions in Cambodia. A locally produced fish-based RUTF is a relevant alternative to imported milk-based RUTF for the treatment of SAM in Cambodia. View Full-Text
Keywords: severe acute malnutrition; fish; ready-to-use therapeutic foods; effectiveness; weight gain; Cambodia severe acute malnutrition; fish; ready-to-use therapeutic foods; effectiveness; weight gain; Cambodia
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Sigh, S.; Roos, N.; Chamnan, C.; Laillou, A.; Prak, S.; Wieringa, F.T. Effectiveness of a Locally Produced, Fish-Based Food Product on Weight Gain among Cambodian Children in the Treatment of Acute Malnutrition: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2018, 10, 909.

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