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Open AccessArticle

Food-Based Social Enterprises and Asylum Seekers: The Food Justice Truck

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School of Health and Social Development, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia
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The Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN) and School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 756; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060756
Received: 8 May 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 12 June 2018
People seeking asylum in high-income countries are vulnerable to food insecurity due to limited opportunities for social and economic participation. While charity organizations have long sought to provide food aid to those in need, the increasing number of people seeking this assistance requires alternatives. Using a case study approach, this research investigates The Food Justice Truck, which is a social enterprise designed to provide low cost, nutritious food to people seeking asylum with an aim to reduce the food insecurity burden. Twenty-seven people seeking asylum completed a structured interview (n = 15) or a semi-structured interview (n = 12). The majority of participants were female (n = 20) with an average age of 38.3 years (Standard Deviation (SD) 7.3; range 30–59) and over half were from Iran (n = 16, 59.2%) with most holding a temporary visa to stay in Australia (n = 15, 55.5%). Two key findings were identified including the fact that the FJT is at risk of creating and perpetuating a power imbalance. However, as a social setting, the FJT has the potential to promote and enable a social connection and create a positive experience. This research study adds valuable information to the literature by providing research on one alternative to traditional food aid. It was found that alternatives to traditional food aid may play a role in reducing the food security burden. View Full-Text
Keywords: food security; social enterprise; asylum seeker; food aid; case study food security; social enterprise; asylum seeker; food aid; case study
MDPI and ACS Style

McKay, F.H.; Lippi, K.; Dunn, M.; Haines, B.C.; Lindberg, R. Food-Based Social Enterprises and Asylum Seekers: The Food Justice Truck. Nutrients 2018, 10, 756.

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