Next Article in Journal
Intestinal Absorption and Antioxidant Activity of Grape Pomace Polyphenols
Previous Article in Journal
Mangosteen Extract Shows a Potent Insulin Sensitizing Effect in Obese Female Patients: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Pilot Study
Open AccessArticle

Ultra-Processed Food Consumption and Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases-Related Dietary Nutrient Profile in the UK (2008–2014)

1
Center for Epidemiological Research in Nutrition and Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 01246-904, Brazil
2
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 01246-904, Brazil
3
Department of Public Policies and Public Health, Federal University of São Paulo, Santos 11015-020, Brazil
4
Public Health Policy Evaluation Unit, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London W6 8RP, UK
5
Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 01246-903, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 587; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050587
Received: 14 April 2018 / Revised: 30 April 2018 / Accepted: 1 May 2018 / Published: 9 May 2018
We described the contribution of ultra-processed foods in the U.K. diet and its association with the overall dietary content of nutrients known to affect the risk of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Cross-sectional data from the U.K. National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2008–2014) were analysed. Food items collected using a four-day food diary were classified according to the NOVA system. The average energy intake was 1764 kcal/day, with 30.1% of calories coming from unprocessed or minimally processed foods, 4.2% from culinary ingredients, 8.8% from processed foods, and 56.8% from ultra-processed foods. As the ultra-processed food consumption increased, the dietary content of carbohydrates, free sugars, total fats, saturated fats, and sodium increased significantly while the content of protein, fibre, and potassium decreased. Increased ultra-processed food consumption had a remarkable effect on average content of free sugars, which increased from 9.9% to 15.4% of total energy from the first to the last quintile. The prevalence of people exceeding the upper limits recommended for free sugars and sodium increased by 85% and 55%, respectively, from the lowest to the highest ultra-processed food quintile. Decreasing the dietary share of ultra-processed foods may substantially improve the nutritional quality of diets and contribute to the prevention of diet-related NCDs. View Full-Text
Keywords: food processing; ultra-processed; diet quality; United Kingdom food processing; ultra-processed; diet quality; United Kingdom
MDPI and ACS Style

Rauber, F.; Da Costa Louzada, M.L.; Steele, E.M.; Millett, C.; Monteiro, C.A.; Levy, R.B. Ultra-Processed Food Consumption and Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases-Related Dietary Nutrient Profile in the UK (2008–2014). Nutrients 2018, 10, 587. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050587

AMA Style

Rauber F, Da Costa Louzada ML, Steele EM, Millett C, Monteiro CA, Levy RB. Ultra-Processed Food Consumption and Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases-Related Dietary Nutrient Profile in the UK (2008–2014). Nutrients. 2018; 10(5):587. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050587

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rauber, Fernanda; Da Costa Louzada, Maria Laura; Steele, Eurídice M.; Millett, Christopher; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto; Levy, Renata Bertazzi. 2018. "Ultra-Processed Food Consumption and Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases-Related Dietary Nutrient Profile in the UK (2008–2014)" Nutrients 10, no. 5: 587. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050587

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop