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Review

Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaneoic Acid (DHA) in Muscle Damage and Function

1
Faculty of Bioscience and Applied Chemistry, Hosei University 3-7-2, Kajino, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8584, Japan
2
Faculty of Modern life, Teikyo Heisei University 4-22-2, Nakano, Tokyo 164-8530, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 552; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050552
Received: 14 March 2018 / Revised: 10 April 2018 / Accepted: 25 April 2018 / Published: 29 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sport and Performance Nutrition)
Nutritional supplementation not only helps in improving and maintaining performance in sports and exercise, but also contributes in reducing exercise fatigue and in recovery from exhaustion. Fish oil contains large amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3). It is widely known that omega-3 fatty acids are effective for improving cardiac function, depression, cognitive function, and blood as well as lowering blood pressure. In the relationship between omega-3 fatty acids and exercise performance, previous studies have been predicted improved endurance performance, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory responses, and effectivity against delayed-onset muscle soreness. However, the optimal dose, duration, and timing remain unclear. This review focuses on the effects of omega-3 fatty acid on muscle damage and function as evaluated by human and animal studies and summarizes its effects on muscle and nerve damage, and muscle mass and strength. View Full-Text
Keywords: omega3; n-3; unsaturated fatty acids; eicosapentaenoic acid; docosahexaenoic acid; muscle damage; muscle hypertrophy; muscle strength; neuromuscular function omega3; n-3; unsaturated fatty acids; eicosapentaenoic acid; docosahexaenoic acid; muscle damage; muscle hypertrophy; muscle strength; neuromuscular function
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ochi, E.; Tsuchiya, Y. Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaneoic Acid (DHA) in Muscle Damage and Function. Nutrients 2018, 10, 552. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050552

AMA Style

Ochi E, Tsuchiya Y. Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaneoic Acid (DHA) in Muscle Damage and Function. Nutrients. 2018; 10(5):552. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050552

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ochi, Eisuke, and Yosuke Tsuchiya. 2018. "Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaneoic Acid (DHA) in Muscle Damage and Function" Nutrients 10, no. 5: 552. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050552

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