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Open AccessArticle

MOSH Syndrome (Male Obesity Secondary Hypogonadism): Clinical Assessment and Possible Therapeutic Approaches

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Section of Clinical Nutrition and Nutrigenomic, Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome, Italy
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Casa di Cura Madonna dello Scoglio, Traversa Mola, 88836 Cotronei, Italy
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Department of Medicine, Hypertension and Nephrology Unit, University Hospital “Tor Vergata”, viale Oxford 81, 00133 Rome, Italy
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Nutrition Service, “Nuova Clinica Annunziatella”, via Meropia 124, 00147 Rome, Italy
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Specialization School of Food Science, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome, Italy
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Unit of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Department of Systems Medicine, CTO “A. Alesini” Hospital, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome, Italy
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School of Applied Medical-Surgical Sciences, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, via Montpellier 1, 00133 Rome, Italy
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 474; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040474
Received: 25 January 2018 / Revised: 26 March 2018 / Accepted: 8 April 2018 / Published: 12 April 2018
Male obesity secondary hypogonadism (MOSH) impairs fertility, sexual function, bone mineralization, fat metabolism, cognitive function, deteriorates muscle mass and alters body composition. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effect of dietary intervention and physical activity on the MOSH patient’s hormonal profile after a 10% weight loss compared to baseline. Fourteen male patients were enrolled. Hormonal, lipid, glycemic profiles and body composition were determined at baseline and after a 10% weight loss. Aging Male Symptoms Scale (AMS) and Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) were administered to patients in order to investigate hypogonadal symptoms and food addiction. Compared to baseline, a significant increase of Total Testosterone (TT) (300.2 ± 79.5 ng/dL vs. 408.3 ± 125.9 ng/dL, p = 0.002, 95% CI 26.8; 167.7) and a reduction of 17-Beta Estradiol level (48.3 ± 14.9 pg/mL vs. 39.2 ± 15.2 pg/mL, p = 0.049, 95% CI 3.1; 0.0) were observed. Total Fat Mass (FM) percentage, android and gynoid fat mass percentage (39.2 ± 6.4% vs. 36.2 ± 5.8%, p = 0.0001, 95% CI 22.5; 62.3; 51.5 ± 6.8% vs. 47.6 ± 6.8%, p = 0.001, 95% CI 0.6; 1.8, vs. 39.2 ± 6.2% vs. 36.5 ± 6.3% p = 0.0001, 95% CI 0.9; 2.0 respectively) were significantly decreased after nutritional intervention. In addition, total Fat Free Mass (FFM) in kg was significantly reduced after 10% weight loss (62.3 ± 2.8 kg vs. 60.3 ± 7.7 kg, p = 0.002, 95% CI 45.0; 93.0). Lifestyle changes, specifically dietotherapy and physical activity, induce positive effects on hypogonadism due to obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: MOSH syndrome; lifestyle change; food addiction; Aromatase activity; Testosterone/17-Beta Estradiol Ratio MOSH syndrome; lifestyle change; food addiction; Aromatase activity; Testosterone/17-Beta Estradiol Ratio
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De Lorenzo, A.; Noce, A.; Moriconi, E.; Rampello, T.; Marrone, G.; Di Daniele, N.; Rovella, V. MOSH Syndrome (Male Obesity Secondary Hypogonadism): Clinical Assessment and Possible Therapeutic Approaches. Nutrients 2018, 10, 474.

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