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Open AccessFeature PaperReview

Nutrition in the Very Old

by Antoneta Granic 1,2,3,†, Nuno Mendonça 3,4,†, Tom R. Hill 5,6, Carol Jagger 3,4, Emma J. Stevenson 5,6, John C. Mathers 3,5,6 and Avan A. Sayer 1,2,3,7,*
1
Institute of Neuroscience, The Medical School, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK
2
NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre, Newcastle University and Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 5PL, UK
3
Newcastle University Institute for Ageing, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4AX, UK
4
Institute for Health and Society, Newcastle University, Baddiley-Clark Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4AX, UK
5
Human Nutrition Research Centre, Newcastle University, William Leech Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK
6
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, William Leech Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK
7
Academic Geriatric Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Joint first authorship.
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 269; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030269
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 21 February 2018 / Accepted: 26 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Ageing)
The population of older adults aged 85 years and over (the very old) is growing rapidly in many societies because of increases in life expectancy and reduced mortality at older ages. In 2016, 27.3 million very old adults were living in the European Union, and in the UK, 2.4% of the population (1.6 million) were aged 85 and over. Very old age is associated with increased risks of malnutrition, multimorbidity, and disability. Diet (nutrition) is a modifiable risk factor for multiple age-related conditions, including sarcopenia and functional decline. Dietary characteristics and nutrient intakes of the very old have been investigated in several European studies of ageing to better understand their nutritional requirements, which may differ from those in the young-old. However, there is a major gap in regard to evidence for the role of dietary patterns, protein, vitamin D and other nutrients for the maintenance of physical and cognitive functioning in later life. The Newcastle 85+ Study, UK and the Life and Living in Advanced Age, New Zealand are unique studies involving single birth cohorts which aim to assess health trajectories in very old adults and their biological, social and environmental influences, including nutrition. In this review, we have updated the latest findings in nutritional epidemiology with results from these studies, concentrating on the diet–physical functioning relationship. View Full-Text
Keywords: the very old; nutrition; diet; dietary patterns; protein intake; malnutrition; physical functioning; the Newcastle 85+ Study; the LiLACS NZ; aged 80 and over the very old; nutrition; diet; dietary patterns; protein intake; malnutrition; physical functioning; the Newcastle 85+ Study; the LiLACS NZ; aged 80 and over
MDPI and ACS Style

Granic, A.; Mendonça, N.; Hill, T.R.; Jagger, C.; Stevenson, E.J.; Mathers, J.C.; Sayer, A.A. Nutrition in the Very Old. Nutrients 2018, 10, 269.

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