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Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1938; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121938

Impact of Protein and Carbohydrate Supplementation on Musculoskeletal Injuries in Army Initial Entry Training Soldiers

1
Warrior Research Center, School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, 301 Wire Road, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
2
UAB Center for Exercise Medicine, University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA
3
Lockwood LLC, Draper, UT 84020, USA
4
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (Auburn Campus), Auburn, AL 36849, USA
5
Molecular and Applied Sciences Laboratory, School of Kinesiology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 November 2018 / Revised: 24 November 2018 / Accepted: 28 November 2018 / Published: 6 December 2018
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Abstract

This project investigated whey protein and/or carbohydrate supplementation effects on musculoskeletal injury (MSI) outcomes. Four groups of Initial Entry Training soldiers consumed either: (1) one protein (38.6 g, 293 kcal); (2) one carbohydrate (63.4 g, 291 kcal); (3) two protein (77.2 g, 586 kcal); or (4) two carbohydrate servings/day (126.8 g, 582 kcal) after physical training and before bed, or before bed only. Odds Ratio, Chi-square and Wilcoxon ranked-sum test compared supplementation/no supplementation, number of servings, and protein/carbohydrate for MSI and limited/missed duty rates and limited/missed training days. Non-matched pairs group averages were compared to 2015/2016 historical data. Non-supplemented soldiers were approximately 5× more likely to sustain a MSI (χ2 = 58.48, p < 0.001) and 4× more likely to miss training (χ2 = 9.73, p = 0.003) compared to two servings. Non-supplemented soldiers missed five additional training days compared to two servings (W = 6059.5, p = 0.02). Soldiers consuming one serving were approximately 3× more likely to sustain a MSI than two servings (χ2 = 9.55, p = 0.002). There was no difference in limited/missed duty rates or limited/missed training days between consuming one or two servings. There was no difference between consuming one serving versus no supplementation or protein versus carbohydrate supplementation for any outcome variable. Soldiers consuming 2 servings/day of protein or carbohydrate had lower MSI rates, limited/missed duty rates, and limited/ missed training days compared to non-supplemented soldiers. View Full-Text
Keywords: musculoskeletal injuries; initial entry training; basic combat training; whey protein; energy intake; military medicine musculoskeletal injuries; initial entry training; basic combat training; whey protein; energy intake; military medicine
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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McGinnis, K.D.; McAdam, J.S.; Lockwood, C.M.; Young, K.C.; Roberts, M.D.; Sefton, J.M. Impact of Protein and Carbohydrate Supplementation on Musculoskeletal Injuries in Army Initial Entry Training Soldiers. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1938.

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