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Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1924; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121924

Selenium and Type 2 Diabetes: Systematic Review

1
Department of Health Promotion Sciences, Mel and Enid College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
2
Department of Epidemiology, Mel and Enid College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
3
Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
4
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
5
Department of Medicine, University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
6
Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 October 2018 / Revised: 13 November 2018 / Accepted: 29 November 2018 / Published: 5 December 2018
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Abstract

Several studies have investigated the potential role of selenium (Se) in the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) with disparate findings. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesize the evidence of any association between Se and T2D. PubMed, Embase, and Scopus were searched following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis Approach (PRISMA). Sixteen studies from 15 papers met inclusion criteria defined for this review. Of the 13 observational studies included, 8 demonstrated a statistically significant positive association between concentrations of Se and odds for T2D, with odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) ranging from 1.52 (1.01–2.28) to 7.64 (3.34–17.46), and a summary odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) of 2.03 (1.51–2.72). In contrast, among randomized clinical trials (RCTs) of Se, a higher risk of T2D was not observed for those who received Se compared to a placebo (OR = 1.18, 95% CI 0.95–1.47). Taken together, the results for the relationship between Se and T2D differ between observational studies and randomized clinical trials (RCTs). It remains unclear whether these differences are the result of uncontrolled confounding in the observational studies, or whether there is a modest effect of Se on the risk for T2D that may vary by duration of exposure. Further investigations on the effects of Se on glucose metabolism are needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: type 2 diabetes; selenium; selenium supplementation; glucose; insulin resistance; review type 2 diabetes; selenium; selenium supplementation; glucose; insulin resistance; review
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Kohler, L.N.; Foote, J.; Kelley, C.P.; Florea, A.; Shelly, C.; Chow, H.-H.S.; Hsu, P.; Batai, K.; Ellis, N.; Saboda, K.; Lance, P.; Jacobs, E.T. Selenium and Type 2 Diabetes: Systematic Review. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1924.

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