Next Article in Journal
Effects of Meal Timing on Postprandial Glucose Metabolism and Blood Metabolites in Healthy Adults
Next Article in Special Issue
Vitamin C Can Shorten the Length of Stay in the ICU: A Meta-Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Cross-Sectional Analysis of Overall Dietary Intake and Mediterranean Dietary Pattern in Patients with Crohn’s Disease
Open AccessReview

Hydrocortisone, Ascorbic Acid and Thiamine (HAT Therapy) for the Treatment of Sepsis. Focus on Ascorbic Acid

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA 23507, USA
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1762; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111762
Received: 12 October 2018 / Revised: 30 October 2018 / Accepted: 8 November 2018 / Published: 14 November 2018
Sepsis is a devastating disease that carries an enormous toll in terms of human suffering and lives lost. Over 100 novel pharmacologic agents that targeted specific molecules or pathways have failed to improve the outcome of sepsis. Preliminary data suggests that the combination of Hydrocortisone, Ascorbic Acid and Thiamine (HAT therapy) may reduce organ failure and mortality in patients with sepsis and septic shock. HAT therapy is based on the concept that a combination of readily available, safe and cheap agents, which target multiple components of the host’s response to an infectious agent, will synergistically restore the dysregulated immune response and thereby prevent organ failure and death. This paper reviews the rationale for HAT therapy with a focus on vitamin C. View Full-Text
Keywords: sepsis; septic shock; hydrocortisone; vitamin C; ascorbic acid; thiamine sepsis; septic shock; hydrocortisone; vitamin C; ascorbic acid; thiamine
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Marik, P.E. Hydrocortisone, Ascorbic Acid and Thiamine (HAT Therapy) for the Treatment of Sepsis. Focus on Ascorbic Acid. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1762.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop