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Article

Targeted Energy Intake Is the Important Determinant of Clinical Outcomes in Medical Critically Ill Patients with High Nutrition Risk

1
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 40705, Taiwan
2
Department of Nursing, Hung Kuang University, Taichung 43302, Taiwan
3
College of Human Science and Social Innovation, Hung Kuang University, Taichung 43302, Taiwan
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School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
5
Department of Food and Nutrition, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 40705, Taiwan
6
School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University; Taichung 40201, Taiwan
7
Department of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
8
Department of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1731; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111731
Received: 14 October 2018 / Revised: 8 November 2018 / Accepted: 9 November 2018 / Published: 11 November 2018
The clinical conditions of critically ill patients are highly heterogeneous; therefore, nutrient requirements should be personalized based on the patient’s nutritional status. However, nutritional status is not always considered when evaluating a patient’s nutritional therapy in the medical intensive care unit (ICU). We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study to assess the effect of ICU patients’ nutrition risk status on the association between energy intake and clinical outcomes (i.e., hospital, 14-day and 28-day mortality). The nutrition risk of critically ill patients was classified as either high- or low-nutrition risk using the modified Nutrition Risk in the Critically Ill score. There were 559 (75.3%) patients in the high nutrition risk group, while 183 patients were in the low nutrition risk group. Higher mean energy intake was associated with lower hospital, 14-day and 28-day mortality rates in patients with high nutrition risk; while there were no significant associations between mean energy intake and clinical outcomes in patients with low nutrition risk. Further examination of the association between amount of energy intake and clinical outcomes showed that patients with high nutrition risk who consumed at least 800 kcal/day had significantly lower hospital, 14-day and 28-day mortality rates. Although patients with low nutrition risk did not benefit from high energy intake, patients with high nutrition risk are suggested to consume at least 800 kcal/day in order to reduce their mortality rate in the medical ICU. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrition risk; energy intake; mortality; critically ill patients; medical ICU nutrition risk; energy intake; mortality; critically ill patients; medical ICU
MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, C.-Y.; Fu, P.-K.; Huang, C.-T.; Chen, C.-H.; Lee, B.-J.; Huang, Y.-C. Targeted Energy Intake Is the Important Determinant of Clinical Outcomes in Medical Critically Ill Patients with High Nutrition Risk. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1731. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111731

AMA Style

Wang C-Y, Fu P-K, Huang C-T, Chen C-H, Lee B-J, Huang Y-C. Targeted Energy Intake Is the Important Determinant of Clinical Outcomes in Medical Critically Ill Patients with High Nutrition Risk. Nutrients. 2018; 10(11):1731. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111731

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wang, Chen-Yu; Fu, Pin-Kuei; Huang, Chun-Te; Chen, Chao-Hsiu; Lee, Bor-Jen; Huang, Yi-Chia. 2018. "Targeted Energy Intake Is the Important Determinant of Clinical Outcomes in Medical Critically Ill Patients with High Nutrition Risk" Nutrients 10, no. 11: 1731. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111731

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