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Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1537; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101537

Probiotics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Disorders

The Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston McGovern Medical School, Houston, TX 77030, USA
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Received: 19 September 2018 / Revised: 14 October 2018 / Accepted: 15 October 2018 / Published: 18 October 2018
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Abstract

Probiotics have been used to ameliorate gastrointestinal symptoms since ancient times. Over the past 40 years, probiotics have been shown to impact the immune system, both in vivo and in vitro. This interaction is linked to gut microbes, their polysaccharide antigens, and key metabolites produced by these bacteria. At least four metabolic pathways have been implicated in mechanistic studies of probiotics, based on mechanistic studies in animal models. Microbial–immune system crosstalk has been linked to: short-chain fatty acid production and signaling, tryptophan metabolism and the activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptors, nucleoside signaling in the gut, and activation of the intestinal histamine-2 receptor. Several randomized controlled trials have now shown that microbial modification by probiotics may improve gastrointestinal symptoms and multiorgan inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and multiple sclerosis. Future work will need to carefully assess safety issues, selection of optimal strains and combinations, and attempts to prolong the duration of colonization of beneficial microbes. View Full-Text
Keywords: lactobacilli; bifidobacilli; arthritis; inflammatory bowel; microbiome; metabolomics; aryl hydrocarbon reductase; adenosine; histamine; short-chain fatty acid lactobacilli; bifidobacilli; arthritis; inflammatory bowel; microbiome; metabolomics; aryl hydrocarbon reductase; adenosine; histamine; short-chain fatty acid
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Liu, Y.; Alookaran, J.J.; Rhoads, J.M. Probiotics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Disorders. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1537.

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