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Open AccessArticle

Effect of Chlorogenic Acids on Cognitive Function: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

1
Health Care Food Research Laboratories, Kao Corporation, 2-1-3 Bunka, Sumida-ku, Tokyo 131-8501, Japan
2
Biological Science Laboratories, Kao Corporation, 2-1-3 Bunka, Sumida-ku, Tokyo 131-8501, Japan
3
Development Research-Health Care/Household, Kao Corporation, 2-1-3 Bunka, Sumida-ku, Tokyo 131-8501, Japan
4
Shiba Pales Clinic, 1-9-10 Hamamatsucho, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0013, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1337; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101337
Received: 30 July 2018 / Revised: 7 September 2018 / Accepted: 18 September 2018 / Published: 20 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Age-Related Disorders)
(1) Background: Chlorogenic acids (CGAs) have been attracting interest of late, owing to their health benefits. Here, we performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to investigate whether CGAs improved cognitive function in humans. (2) Methods: Thirty-eight healthy participants were assigned to either the CGA group, which was given CGA-added beverage daily for 16 weeks, or the placebo group. Cognitive functions were assessed using the Japanese version of the CNS Vital Signs (Cognitrax). (3) Results: The CGA group showed significant increase in the Cognitrax domain scores for motor speed, psychomotor speed, and executive function compared with the placebo group, as well as an improvement in the shifting attention test scores. In blood analysis, the CGA group showed increased levels of apolipoprotein A1 and transthyretin, both of which are putative biomarkers for early-stage cognitive decline. (4) Conclusions: These results suggest that CGAs may improve some cognitive functions, which would help in the efficient performance of complex tasks. View Full-Text
Keywords: chlorogenic acid; cognitive functions; psychomotor speed chlorogenic acid; cognitive functions; psychomotor speed
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MDPI and ACS Style

Saitou, K.; Ochiai, R.; Kozuma, K.; Sato, H.; Koikeda, T.; Osaki, N.; Katsuragi, Y. Effect of Chlorogenic Acids on Cognitive Function: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1337.

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