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Open AccessArticle

Higher Protein Intake Is Not Associated with Decreased Kidney Function in Pre-Diabetic Older Adults Following a One-Year Intervention—A Preview Sub-Study

1
Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, 1958 Copenhagen, Denmark
2
Human Nutrition Unit, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
3
Centre for Nutrition Research, University of Navarra, Calle Lrunlrrea 1, 31008 Pamplona, Navarra, Spain
4
CIBERobn, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, C/Monforte de Lemos 3–5, 28029 Madrid, Spain
5
Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland
6
School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
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Institute IMDEA Food, Crta. De Canto Blanco 8, 28029 Madrid, Spain
8
School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, A-STEM Research Centre, Swansea University, Singleton Park SA2 8PP, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(1), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010054
Received: 27 November 2017 / Revised: 27 December 2017 / Accepted: 3 January 2018 / Published: 9 January 2018
Concerns about detrimental renal effects of a high-protein intake have been raised due to an induced glomerular hyperfiltration, since this may accelerate the progression of kidney disease. The aim of this sub-study was to assess the effect of a higher intake of protein on kidney function in pre-diabetic men and women, aged 55 years and older. Analyses were based on baseline and one-year data in a sub-group of 310 participants included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World). Protein intake was estimated from four-day dietary records and 24-hour urinary urea excretion. We used linear regression to assess the association between protein intake after one year of intervention and kidney function markers: creatinine clearance, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), urinary urea/creatinine ratio (UCR), serum creatinine, and serum urea before and after adjustments for potential confounders. A higher protein intake was associated with a significant increase in UCR (p = 0.03) and serum urea (p = 0.05) after one year. There were no associations between increased protein intake and creatinine clearance, eGFR, ACR, or serum creatinine. We found no indication of impaired kidney function after one year with a higher protein intake in pre-diabetic older adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: pre-diabetes; dietary protein; creatinine clearance; glomerular filtration rate; albumin; urea pre-diabetes; dietary protein; creatinine clearance; glomerular filtration rate; albumin; urea
MDPI and ACS Style

Møller, G.; Rikardt Andersen, J.; Ritz, C.; P. Silvestre, M.; Navas-Carretero, S.; Jalo, E.; Christensen, P.; Simpson, E.; Taylor, M.; Martinez, J.A.; Macdonald, I.; Swindell, N.; Mackintosh, K.A.; Stratton, G.; Fogelholm, M.; Larsen, T.M.; Poppitt, S.D.; Dragsted, L.O.; Raben, A. Higher Protein Intake Is Not Associated with Decreased Kidney Function in Pre-Diabetic Older Adults Following a One-Year Intervention—A Preview Sub-Study. Nutrients 2018, 10, 54.

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