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Article

Precipitation Products’ Inter–Comparison over East and Southern Africa 1983–2017

1
National Research Council, Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR–ISAC, 40129 Bologna, Italy
2
National Research Council, Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR–ISAC, 10133 Torino, Italy
3
Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, 10124 Torino, Italy
4
Instituto de Medio Ambiente (IMA), University of León, 24071 León, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alessandro Battaglia
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(21), 4419; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13214419
Received: 13 September 2021 / Revised: 22 October 2021 / Accepted: 28 October 2021 / Published: 3 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Remote Sensing in Geology, Geomorphology and Hydrology)
During recent decades East Africa (EA) and Southern Africa (SA) have experienced an intensification of hydrological hazards, such as floods and droughts, which have dramatically affected the population, making these areas two of the regions of the African continent most vulnerable to these hazards. Thus, precipitation monitoring and the evaluation of its variability have become fundamentally important actions through the analysis of long-term data records. In particular, satellite-based precipitation products are often used because they counterbalance the sparsity of the rain gauge networks which often characterize these areas. The aim of this work is to compare and contrast the capabilities of three daily satellite-based products in EA and SA from 1983 to 2017. The selected products are two daily rainfall datasets based on high-resolution thermal infrared observations, TAMSAT version 3 and CHIRPS, and a relatively new global product, MSWEP version 2.2, which merges satellite-based, rain gauge and re-analysis precipitation data. The datasets have been directly intercompared, avoiding the traditional rain gauge validation. This is done by means of pairwise comparison statistics at 0.25° spatial resolution and daily time scale to assess rain–detection and quantitative estimate capabilities. Monthly climatology and spatial distribution of seasonality are analyzed as well. The time evolution of the statistical indexes has been evaluated in order to analyze the stability of the rain detection and estimation performances. Considerable agreement among the precipitation products emerged from the analysis, in spite of the differences occurring in specific situations over complex terrain, such as mountainous and coastal regions and deserts. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the statistical indices has demonstrated that the agreement between the products improved over time, with more stable capabilities in identifying precipitating days and estimating daily precipitation starting in the second half of the 1990s. View Full-Text
Keywords: Africa; precipitation; long-term data sets; satellite; intercomparison Africa; precipitation; long-term data sets; satellite; intercomparison
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cattani, E.; Ferguglia, O.; Merino, A.; Levizzani, V. Precipitation Products’ Inter–Comparison over East and Southern Africa 1983–2017. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 4419. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13214419

AMA Style

Cattani E, Ferguglia O, Merino A, Levizzani V. Precipitation Products’ Inter–Comparison over East and Southern Africa 1983–2017. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(21):4419. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13214419

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cattani, Elsa, Olivia Ferguglia, Andrés Merino, and Vincenzo Levizzani. 2021. "Precipitation Products’ Inter–Comparison over East and Southern Africa 1983–2017" Remote Sensing 13, no. 21: 4419. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13214419

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