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Article

Crossing the Great Divide: Bridging the Researcher–Practitioner Gap to Maximize the Utility of Remote Sensing for Invasive Species Monitoring and Management

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Environmental Sciences Initiative, The City University of New York Advanced Science Research Center, New York, NY 10031, USA
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Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate Center, The City University of New York, New York, NY 10016, USA
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School for the Environment, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA 02125, USA
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Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology (OEB), Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
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Forest Service Northern Research Station, New York City Urban Field Station, Bayside, New York, NY 11359, USA
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Catskill Regional Invasive Species Partnership (CRISP), Catskill Center, Arkville, NY 12406, USA
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The Nature Conservancy, Keene Valley, NY 12943, USA
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Department of Geography and Environmental Science, Hunter College, New York, NY 10065, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ioannis Gitas and Thomas Katagis
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(20), 4142; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13204142
Received: 10 September 2021 / Revised: 5 October 2021 / Accepted: 13 October 2021 / Published: 16 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Remote Sensing of Forest Cover Change)
Invasive species are increasingly present in our ecosystems and pose a threat to the health of forest ecosystems. Practitioners are tasked with locating these invasive species and finding ways to mitigate their spread and impacts, often through costly field surveys. Meanwhile, researchers are developing remote sensing products to detect the changes in vegetation health and structure that are caused by invasive species, which could aid in early detection and monitoring efforts. Although both groups are working towards similar goals and field data are essential for validating RS products, these groups often work independently. In this paper, we, a group of researchers and practitioners, discuss the challenges to bridging the gap between researchers and practitioners and summarize the literature on this topic. We also draw from our experiences collaborating with each other to advance detection, monitoring, and management of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae; HWA), an invasive forest pest in the eastern U.S. We conclude by (1) highlighting the synergies and symbiotic mutualism of researcher–practitioner collaborations and (2) providing a framework for facilitating researcher–practitioner collaborations that advance fundamental science while maximizing the capacity of RS technologies in monitoring and management of complex drivers of forest health decline such as invasive species. View Full-Text
Keywords: remote sensing; invasive species; researcher–practitioner gap; hemlock woolly adelgid; saltcedar remote sensing; invasive species; researcher–practitioner gap; hemlock woolly adelgid; saltcedar
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MDPI and ACS Style

Parker, K.; Elmes, A.; Boucher, P.; Hallett, R.A.; Thompson, J.E.; Simek, Z.; Bowers, J.; Reinmann, A.B. Crossing the Great Divide: Bridging the Researcher–Practitioner Gap to Maximize the Utility of Remote Sensing for Invasive Species Monitoring and Management. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 4142. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13204142

AMA Style

Parker K, Elmes A, Boucher P, Hallett RA, Thompson JE, Simek Z, Bowers J, Reinmann AB. Crossing the Great Divide: Bridging the Researcher–Practitioner Gap to Maximize the Utility of Remote Sensing for Invasive Species Monitoring and Management. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(20):4142. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13204142

Chicago/Turabian Style

Parker, Kelsey, Arthur Elmes, Peter Boucher, Richard A. Hallett, John E. Thompson, Zachary Simek, Justin Bowers, and Andrew B. Reinmann. 2021. "Crossing the Great Divide: Bridging the Researcher–Practitioner Gap to Maximize the Utility of Remote Sensing for Invasive Species Monitoring and Management" Remote Sensing 13, no. 20: 4142. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13204142

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