Next Article in Journal
On the Generalization Ability of Data-Driven Models in the Problem of Total Cloud Cover Retrieval
Previous Article in Journal
Triple-Attention-Based Parallel Network for Hyperspectral Image Classification
Previous Article in Special Issue
Changing Patterns of Malaria in Grande Comore after a Drastic Decline: Importance of Fine-Scale Spatial Analysis to Inform Future Control Actions
Open AccessArticle

Predicting the Presence of Leptospires in Rodents from Environmental Indicators Opens Up Opportunities for Environmental Monitoring of Human Leptospirosis

1
UMR PIMIT (Processus Infectieux en Milieu Insulaire Tropical), Université de La Réunion, CNRS 9192, INSERM U 1187, IRD 249, Plateforme de Recherche CYROI, 97490 Sainte Clotilde, La Réunion, France
2
Centre de Recherche et de Veille sur les Maladies Emergentes dans l’Océan Indien (CRVOI), Plateforme de Recherche CYROI, 97490 Sainte Clotilde, La Réunion, France
3
Seychelles Public Health Laboratory, Infectious Disease Surveillance Unit, Public Health Authority, Ministry of Health, Mont Fleuri P.O. Box 52, Mahé, Seychelles
4
UMR ESPACE-DEV, IRD (IRD, Univ. Antilles, Univ. Guyane, Univ. Montpellier, Univ. Réunion), 97410 Saint-Pierre, La Réunion, France
5
Island Biodiversity and Conservation Centre, University of Seychelles (Unisey), Anse Royale P.O. Box 1348, Mahé, Seychelles
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: National Animal Disease Center, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Ames, IA 50010, USA.
Current address: Institut Pasteur (Direction Internationale), CEDEX 15, 75724 Paris, France.
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(2), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020325
Received: 15 October 2020 / Revised: 19 December 2020 / Accepted: 8 January 2021 / Published: 19 January 2021
Leptospirosis, an environmental infectious disease of bacterial origin, is the infectious disease with the highest associated mortality in Seychelles. In small island territories, the occurrence of the disease is spatially heterogeneous and a better understanding of the environmental factors that contribute to the presence of the bacteria would help implement targeted control. The present study aimed at identifying the main environmental parameters correlated with animal reservoirs distribution and Leptospira infection in order to delineate habitats with highest prevalence. We used a previously published dataset produced from a large collection of rodents trapped during the dry and wet seasons in most habitats of Mahé, the main island of Seychelles. A land use/land cover analysis was realized in order to describe the various environments using SPOT-5 images by remote sensing (object-based image analysis). At each sampling site, landscape indices were calculated and combined with other geographical parameters together with rainfall records to be used in a multivariate statistical analysis. Several environmental factors were found to be associated with the carriage of leptospires in Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus, namely low elevations, fragmented landscapes, the proximity of urbanized areas, an increased distance from forests and, above all, increased precipitation in the three months preceding trapping. The analysis indicated that Leptospira renal carriage could be predicted using the species identification and a description of landscape fragmentation and rainfall, with infection prevalence being positively correlated with these two environmental variables. This model may help decision makers in implementing policies affecting urban landscapes and/or in balancing conservation efforts when designing pest control strategies that should also aim at reducing human contact with Leptospira-laden rats while limiting their impact on the autochthonous fauna. View Full-Text
Keywords: leptospirosis; rodents; Rattus rattus; Rattus norvegicus; spatial analysis; remote sensing; landscape metrics; satellite; ecology leptospirosis; rodents; Rattus rattus; Rattus norvegicus; spatial analysis; remote sensing; landscape metrics; satellite; ecology
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Biscornet, L.; Révillion, C.; Jégo, S.; Lagadec, E.; Gomard, Y.; Le Minter, G.; Rocamora, G.; Guernier-Cambert, V.; Mélade, J.; Dellagi, K.; Tortosa, P.; Herbreteau, V. Predicting the Presence of Leptospires in Rodents from Environmental Indicators Opens Up Opportunities for Environmental Monitoring of Human Leptospirosis. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 325. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020325

AMA Style

Biscornet L, Révillion C, Jégo S, Lagadec E, Gomard Y, Le Minter G, Rocamora G, Guernier-Cambert V, Mélade J, Dellagi K, Tortosa P, Herbreteau V. Predicting the Presence of Leptospires in Rodents from Environmental Indicators Opens Up Opportunities for Environmental Monitoring of Human Leptospirosis. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(2):325. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020325

Chicago/Turabian Style

Biscornet, Leon; Révillion, Christophe; Jégo, Sylvaine; Lagadec, Erwan; Gomard, Yann; Le Minter, Gildas; Rocamora, Gérard; Guernier-Cambert, Vanina; Mélade, Julien; Dellagi, Koussay; Tortosa, Pablo; Herbreteau, Vincent. 2021. "Predicting the Presence of Leptospires in Rodents from Environmental Indicators Opens Up Opportunities for Environmental Monitoring of Human Leptospirosis" Remote Sens. 13, no. 2: 325. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020325

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop