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The VEI 2 Christmas 2018 Etna Eruption: A Small But Intense Eruptive Event or the Starting Phase of a Larger One?

Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Osservatorio Etneo-Sezione di Catania (INGV-OE), 95032 Sezione di Catania, Italy
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Remote Sens. 2020, 12(6), 905; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12060905
Received: 6 February 2020 / Revised: 5 March 2020 / Accepted: 11 March 2020 / Published: 12 March 2020
The Etna flank eruption that started on 24 December 2018 lasted a few days and involved the opening of an eruptive fissure, accompanied by a seismic swarm and shallow earthquakes, significant SO2 flux release, and by large and widespread ground deformation, especially on the eastern flank of the volcano. Lava fountains and ash plumes from the uppermost eruptive fissure accompanied the opening stage, causing disruption to Catania International Airport, and were followed by a quiet lava effusion within the barren Valle del Bove depression until 27 December. This was the first flank eruption to occur at Etna in the last decade, during which eruptive activity was confined to the summit craters and resulted in lava fountains and lava flow output from the crater rims. In this paper, we used ground and satellite remote sensing techniques to describe the sequence of events, quantify the erupted volumes of lava, gas, and tephra, and assess volcanic hazards. View Full-Text
Keywords: Etna volcano; monitoring eruptive activity; lava fountains; ash plume; lava flow field; satellite remote sensing; web-cameras monitoring network; SO2 flux Etna volcano; monitoring eruptive activity; lava fountains; ash plume; lava flow field; satellite remote sensing; web-cameras monitoring network; SO2 flux
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MDPI and ACS Style

Calvari, S.; Bilotta, G.; Bonaccorso, A.; Caltabiano, T.; Cappello, A.; Corradino, C.; Del Negro, C.; Ganci, G.; Neri, M.; Pecora, E.; Salerno, G.G.; Spampinato, L. The VEI 2 Christmas 2018 Etna Eruption: A Small But Intense Eruptive Event or the Starting Phase of a Larger One? Remote Sens. 2020, 12, 905. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12060905

AMA Style

Calvari S, Bilotta G, Bonaccorso A, Caltabiano T, Cappello A, Corradino C, Del Negro C, Ganci G, Neri M, Pecora E, Salerno GG, Spampinato L. The VEI 2 Christmas 2018 Etna Eruption: A Small But Intense Eruptive Event or the Starting Phase of a Larger One? Remote Sensing. 2020; 12(6):905. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12060905

Chicago/Turabian Style

Calvari, Sonia; Bilotta, Giuseppe; Bonaccorso, Alessandro; Caltabiano, Tommaso; Cappello, Annalisa; Corradino, Claudia; Del Negro, Ciro; Ganci, Gaetana; Neri, Marco; Pecora, Emilio; Salerno, Giuseppe G.; Spampinato, Letizia. 2020. "The VEI 2 Christmas 2018 Etna Eruption: A Small But Intense Eruptive Event or the Starting Phase of a Larger One?" Remote Sens. 12, no. 6: 905. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12060905

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