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Open AccessArticle

Retrospective InSAR Analysis of East London during the Construction of the Lee Tunnel

1
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
2
Department of Earth Sciences, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX, UK
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Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK
4
Soil Engineering Geoservices Limited, Foundation Court, Watchmoor Park, Camberley, Surrey GU15 3RG, UK
5
CGG Satellite Mapping, Crockham Park, Edenbridge TN8 6SR, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(5), 849; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12050849
Received: 7 February 2020 / Revised: 4 March 2020 / Accepted: 4 March 2020 / Published: 6 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing in Engineering Geology)
The Lee Tunnel was constructed as the first part of the Thames Tideway Improvement scheme, between 2010 and 2016. With tunnelling for the East section of the main Thames Tideway Tunnel, which joins the Lee Tunnel at Abbey Mills Pumping Station, beginning in early 2020, this paper investigates patterns of deformation in East London during construction of the Lee Tunnel. An unexpected geological feature, later identified as a drift filled hollow, was discovered during tunnelling. This study demonstrates that had eight years of ERS Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) data been analysed prior to tunnelling, the unusual pattern of displacement may have been recognised and further targeted borehole investigations taken place before the launch of the tunnel boring machine. Results also show how areas of different land use, including cemeteries and historic landfill, exhibit differences in settlement behaviour, compared with surrounding terraced housing. This research highlights the challenges in interpreting PSI results in an urban area with ongoing construction and the value of a long archive of data, which now spans almost three decades in London, that can be used to establish a baseline prior to construction. View Full-Text
Keywords: Persistent Scatterer Interferometry; InSAR; urban subsidence; London; tunnelling Persistent Scatterer Interferometry; InSAR; urban subsidence; London; tunnelling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Scoular, J.; Ghail, R.; Mason, P.; Lawrence, J.; Bellhouse, M.; Holley, R.; Morgan, T. Retrospective InSAR Analysis of East London during the Construction of the Lee Tunnel. Remote Sens. 2020, 12, 849.

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