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Article

An Evaluation of Radiative Transfer Simulations of Cloudy Scenes from a Numerical Weather Prediction Model at Sub-Millimetre Frequencies Using Airborne Observations

Met Office, FitzRoy Road, Exeter EX1 3PB, UK
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(17), 2758; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12172758
Received: 6 August 2020 / Revised: 22 August 2020 / Accepted: 23 August 2020 / Published: 25 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Remote Sensing to the Weather Prediction)
The Ice Cloud Imager (ICI) will be launched on the next generation of EUMETSAT polar-orbiting weather satellites and make passive observations between 183 and 664 GHz which are sensitive to scattering from cloud ice. These observations have the potential to improve weather forecasts through direct assimilation using "all-sky" methods which have been successfully applied to microwave observations up to 200 GHz in current operational systems. This requires sufficiently accurate representations of cloud ice in both numerical weather prediction (NWP) and radiative transfer models. In this study, atmospheric fields from a high-resolution NWP model are used to drive radiative transfer simulations using the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS) and a recently released database of cloud ice optical properties. The simulations are evaluated using measurements between 89 and 874 GHz from five case studies of ice and mixed-phase clouds observed by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft. The simulations are strongly sensitive to the assumed cloud ice optical properties, but by choosing an appropriate ice crystal model it is possible to simulate realistic brightness temperatures over the full range of sub-millimetre frequencies. This suggests that sub-millimetre observations have the potential to be assimilated into NWP models using the all-sky method. View Full-Text
Keywords: sub-millimetre; ice cloud; radiative transfer; NWP sub-millimetre; ice cloud; radiative transfer; NWP
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    Doi: 10.5281/zenodo.3923663
    Description: Atmospheric fields, ARTS controlfiles and simulated sub-milllimetre brightness temperatures required to reproduce results
MDPI and ACS Style

Fox, S. An Evaluation of Radiative Transfer Simulations of Cloudy Scenes from a Numerical Weather Prediction Model at Sub-Millimetre Frequencies Using Airborne Observations. Remote Sens. 2020, 12, 2758. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12172758

AMA Style

Fox S. An Evaluation of Radiative Transfer Simulations of Cloudy Scenes from a Numerical Weather Prediction Model at Sub-Millimetre Frequencies Using Airborne Observations. Remote Sensing. 2020; 12(17):2758. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12172758

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fox, Stuart. 2020. "An Evaluation of Radiative Transfer Simulations of Cloudy Scenes from a Numerical Weather Prediction Model at Sub-Millimetre Frequencies Using Airborne Observations" Remote Sensing 12, no. 17: 2758. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12172758

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