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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Methane Mapping with Future Satellite Imaging Spectrometers

1
Department of Geography, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
2
Department of Geography, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
3
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA
4
Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
5
Office for Research, Innovation and Impact, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2019, 11(24), 3054; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs11243054
Received: 14 November 2019 / Revised: 6 December 2019 / Accepted: 13 December 2019 / Published: 17 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Remote Sensing in North America 2019)
This study evaluates a new generation of satellite imaging spectrometers to measure point source methane emissions from anthropogenic sources. We used the Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer Next Generation(AVIRIS-NG) images with known methane plumes to create two simulated satellite products. One simulation had a 30 m spatial resolution with ~200 Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) in the Shortwave Infrared (SWIR) and the other had a 60 m spatial resolution with ~400 SNR in the SWIR; both products had a 7.5 nm spectral spacing. We applied a linear matched filter with a sparsity prior and an albedo correction to detect and quantify the methane emission in the original AVIRIS-NG images and in both satellite simulations. We also calculated an emission flux for all images. We found that all methane plumes were detectable in all satellite simulations. The flux calculations for the simulated satellite images correlated well with the calculated flux for the original AVIRIS-NG images. We also found that coarsening spatial resolution had the largest impact on the sensitivity of the results. These results suggest that methane detection and quantification of point sources will be possible with the next generation of satellite imaging spectrometers. View Full-Text
Keywords: methane; imaging spectrometer; hyperspectral; gas plumes; satellite; EMIT; AVIRIS-NG; matched filter; remote sensing methane; imaging spectrometer; hyperspectral; gas plumes; satellite; EMIT; AVIRIS-NG; matched filter; remote sensing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ayasse, A.K.; Dennison, P.E.; Foote, M.; Thorpe, A.K.; Joshi, S.; Green, R.O.; Duren, R.M.; Thompson, D.R.; Roberts, D.A. Methane Mapping with Future Satellite Imaging Spectrometers. Remote Sens. 2019, 11, 3054.

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