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Article

To Green or Not to Green: A Political, Economic and Social Analysis for the Past Failure of Green Logistics

1
Department of Industrial Engineering and Business Information Systems (IEBIS), University of Twente, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede, The Netherlands
2
Institute for Logistics and Service Management, FOM University of Applied Sciences, Leimkugelstr. 6, 45141 Essen, Germany
Academic Editors: Russell G Thompson and Benjamin T. Hazen
Sustainability 2016, 8(5), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/su8050441
Received: 13 February 2016 / Revised: 20 April 2016 / Accepted: 26 April 2016 / Published: 4 May 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Logistics)
The objective of green logistics has thus far failed. For example, the share of greenhouse gas emissions by the transportation and logistics sector in Europe rose from 16.6% in 1990 to 24.3% in 2012. This article analyzes the reasons behind this failure by drawing on political, economic and business as well as social motivations and examples. At the core of this analysis are the established theorems of the Jevons paradox and the median voter (Black, Downs) in combination with time-distorted preferences of voters and consumers. Adding to the hurdles of green logistics are the problems of short-term political programs and decisions versus long-term business investments in transportation and logistics. Two cases from Germany are outlined regarding this political “meddling through” with a recent 2015 truck toll decision and the support for electric trucks and vehicles. Finally, the article proposes two ways forward: public control and restriction of carbon raw materials (coal, oil), as well as public investment in low-emission transport infrastructure or biofuels as the more feasible and likely alternative. View Full-Text
Keywords: Jevons paradox; median voter; time-distorted preferences; green transportation technology; e-vehicles; truck toll system Jevons paradox; median voter; time-distorted preferences; green transportation technology; e-vehicles; truck toll system
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MDPI and ACS Style

Klumpp, M. To Green or Not to Green: A Political, Economic and Social Analysis for the Past Failure of Green Logistics. Sustainability 2016, 8, 441. https://doi.org/10.3390/su8050441

AMA Style

Klumpp M. To Green or Not to Green: A Political, Economic and Social Analysis for the Past Failure of Green Logistics. Sustainability. 2016; 8(5):441. https://doi.org/10.3390/su8050441

Chicago/Turabian Style

Klumpp, Matthias. 2016. "To Green or Not to Green: A Political, Economic and Social Analysis for the Past Failure of Green Logistics" Sustainability 8, no. 5: 441. https://doi.org/10.3390/su8050441

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