Next Article in Journal
Understanding Resilient Urban Futures: A Systemic Modelling Approach
Next Article in Special Issue
The Influence of Different Cover Types on American Robin Nest Success in Organic Agroecosystems
Previous Article in Journal
World Heritage Protection and the Human Right to Development: Reconciling Competing or Complimentary Narratives Using a Human Rights-Based Approach (HRBA)?
Previous Article in Special Issue
Critical Overview on Organic Legislation for Animal Production: Towards Conventionalization of the System?
Review

Impacts of Organic Zero Tillage Systems on Crops, Weeds, and Soil Quality

1
Dickinson Research Extension Center, North Dakota State University, 1041 State Avenue, Dickinson, ND 58601, USA
2
North Dakota State University, 166 Loftsgard Hall, Fargo, ND 58108, USA
3
Northern Great Plains Research Laboratory, USDA-ARS, P.O. Box 459, Mandan, ND 58544, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2013, 5(7), 3172-3201; https://doi.org/10.3390/su5073172
Received: 24 May 2013 / Revised: 5 July 2013 / Accepted: 15 July 2013 / Published: 22 July 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Organic Farming and a Systems Approach to Sustainable Agroecosystems)
Organic farming has been identified as promoting soil quality even though tillage is used for weed suppression. Adopting zero tillage and other conservation tillage practices can enhance soil quality in cropping systems where synthetic agri-chemicals are relied on for crop nutrition and weed control. Attempts have been made to eliminate tillage completely when growing several field crops organically. Vegetative mulch produced by killed cover crops in organic zero tillage systems can suppress annual weeds, but large amounts are needed for adequate early season weed control. Established perennial weeds are not controlled by cover crop mulch. Integrated weed management strategies that include other cultural as well as biological and mechanical controls have potential and need to be incorporated into organic zero tillage research efforts. Market crop performance in organic zero tillage systems has been mixed because of weed, nutrient cycling, and other problems that still must be solved. Soil quality benefits have been demonstrated in comparisons between organic conservation tillage and inversion tillage systems, but studies that include zero tillage treatments are lacking. Research is needed which identifies agronomic strategies for optimum market crop performance, acceptable levels of weed suppression, and soil quality benefits following adoption of organic zero tillage. View Full-Text
Keywords: organic farming; biological farming; ecological agriculture; conservation tillage; no-till; cover crops; soil quality; weeds organic farming; biological farming; ecological agriculture; conservation tillage; no-till; cover crops; soil quality; weeds
MDPI and ACS Style

Carr, P.M.; Gramig, G.G.; Liebig, M.A. Impacts of Organic Zero Tillage Systems on Crops, Weeds, and Soil Quality. Sustainability 2013, 5, 3172-3201. https://doi.org/10.3390/su5073172

AMA Style

Carr PM, Gramig GG, Liebig MA. Impacts of Organic Zero Tillage Systems on Crops, Weeds, and Soil Quality. Sustainability. 2013; 5(7):3172-3201. https://doi.org/10.3390/su5073172

Chicago/Turabian Style

Carr, Patrick M., Greta G. Gramig, and Mark A. Liebig. 2013. "Impacts of Organic Zero Tillage Systems on Crops, Weeds, and Soil Quality" Sustainability 5, no. 7: 3172-3201. https://doi.org/10.3390/su5073172

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Back to TopTop