Next Article in Journal
The Importance of Food Attributes and Motivational Factors for Purchasing Local Food Products: Segmentation of Young Local Food Consumers in Hungary
Next Article in Special Issue
Canada’s Impact Assessment Act, 2019: Indigenous Peoples, Cultural Sustainability, and Environmental Justice
Previous Article in Journal
Supervisor Leadership and Subordinates’ Innovative Work Behaviors: Creating a Relational Context for Organizational Sustainability
Previous Article in Special Issue
Unpacking the WEF Nexus Index: A Regional and Sub-Regional Analysis of Northern Canada
Article

Strengthening Collaboration of the Indigenous Peoples in the Russian Arctic: Adaptation in the COVID-19 Pandemic Times

1
Department of Economics and Management, Northern Arctic Federal University, 163002 Arkhangelsk, Russia
2
Arctic Scientific Research Centre of Yamal-Nenets Autonomous Okrug, 629008 Salekhard, Russia
3
Luzin Institute for Economic Studies, Federal Research Centre, Kola Science Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 184209 Apatity, Russia
4
Naryan-Mar Agriculture Research Station, N. Laverov Federal Research Center for Integrated Arctic Research of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 166000 Naryan-Mar, Russia
5
Laboratory of Socio-Ecological-Economic Systems, N. Laverov Federal Research Center for Integrated Arctic Research of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 163069 Arkhangelsk, Russia
6
Department of State and Municipal Management, Northern Arctic Federal University, 163002 Arkhangelsk, Russia
7
Northern Institute of Environmental and Minority Law, Arctic Center of the Lapland University, 96101 Rovaniemi, Finland
8
Association of Reindeer Herders in YNAO, 629000 Salekhard, Russia
9
Laboratory for Studying the Mechanisms of Physical Factors Action, Centre for Testing and Examination of Natural Healing Resources, National Medical Research Centre for Rehabilitation and Balneology, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, 121099 Moscow, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: David Natcher and Liza Mack
Sustainability 2022, 14(6), 3225; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14063225
Received: 27 January 2022 / Revised: 3 March 2022 / Accepted: 5 March 2022 / Published: 9 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indigenous Peoples and Sustainable Development in the Arctic)
The article presents the challenges of the Indigenous peoples’ interplay with the key actors (Indigenous communities, Indigenous associations, regional governments, corporate businesses, and scientific institutions) in the Russian Arctic. Invoking actor–network theory offered knowledge to analyse how the effectiveness of this collaboration may lead to Indigenous peoples’ social adaptation in the COVID-19 times. It revealed the main problems increasing their vulnerability and making barriers to meeting sustainable development goals (SDGs). The primary sources included the data collected from expert interviews in the Yamal-Nenets Autonomous Okrug, the Nenets Autonomous Okrug, and the Murmansk region in 2020–2021. The main findings proved the gaps in the interplay of Indigenous peoples with key actors in the Russian Arctic due to insufficient interregional and international cooperation, indirect communication of governments with Indigenous peoples via Indigenous associations and communities focused mostly on supporting elites, and the lack of systematic feedback of all key actors. This collaboration must be focused on meeting SDGs and guaranteeing their economic, social, and cultural rights to maintain a traditional lifestyle and livelihoods, involving them in natural resource management, improving quality of life and well-being, increasing access to ethnocultural education, reducing inequality, and promoting Indigenous peoples’ self-government. View Full-Text
Keywords: Indigenous small-numbered peoples; actor–networking theory; sustainable development; COVID-19 pandemic; Western Siberia; Nenets Autonomous Okrug; Kola Peninsula Indigenous small-numbered peoples; actor–networking theory; sustainable development; COVID-19 pandemic; Western Siberia; Nenets Autonomous Okrug; Kola Peninsula
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bogdanova, E.; Filant, K.; Ivanova, M.; Romanenko, T.; Voronina, L.; Hossain, K.; Filant, P.; Andronov, S.; Lobanov, A. Strengthening Collaboration of the Indigenous Peoples in the Russian Arctic: Adaptation in the COVID-19 Pandemic Times. Sustainability 2022, 14, 3225. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14063225

AMA Style

Bogdanova E, Filant K, Ivanova M, Romanenko T, Voronina L, Hossain K, Filant P, Andronov S, Lobanov A. Strengthening Collaboration of the Indigenous Peoples in the Russian Arctic: Adaptation in the COVID-19 Pandemic Times. Sustainability. 2022; 14(6):3225. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14063225

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bogdanova, Elena, Konstantin Filant, Medeya Ivanova, Tatiana Romanenko, Ludmila Voronina, Kamrul Hossain, Praskovia Filant, Sergei Andronov, and Andrey Lobanov. 2022. "Strengthening Collaboration of the Indigenous Peoples in the Russian Arctic: Adaptation in the COVID-19 Pandemic Times" Sustainability 14, no. 6: 3225. https://doi.org/10.3390/su14063225

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop