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Article

Intrinsic Value and Perceived Essentialism of Culture Heritage Sites as Tools for Planning Interventions

1
Robert Zajonc Institute for Social Studies, University of Warsaw, 00-183 Warszawa, Poland
2
Faculty of Psychology, University of Warsaw, 00-183 Warszawa, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Luigi Fusco Girard and Marc A. Rosen
Sustainability 2021, 13(9), 5078; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095078
Received: 10 February 2021 / Revised: 17 April 2021 / Accepted: 27 April 2021 / Published: 30 April 2021
In order to remain alive and relevant, cultural heritage sites have to react and adapt to changing context in a coherent manner, i.e., in a way that is in line with the memory and identity of the place. The incoherent changes, i.e., the transformations that according to the local community do not agree with a character of a place, can be destructive for the long-term vitality of urban cultural heritage. In this study, we test which factors influence social acceptance of different alternations within the context of urban historical gardens that might, in turn, ensure the resilience of the place. Our study focuses on the intangible qualities of the place measured by intrinsic value, perceived essentialism and anti-essentialism as important predictors shaping the response to change. The correlational study was conducted using an online questionnaire designed to empirically grasp intangible qualities of cultural heritage sites. Five hundred twenty-nine responses were included in the analysis. The study shows that perceived historic value, inherent value (uniqueness and importance of the place) and (anti-)essentialist character of a place capture the differences between parks well and enables the finding of interventions that are coherent with a site’s genius loci. Measuring intangible qualities of urban gardens can help to design changes that find higher approval among local community members and users of the site. We discuss how the analysis of an intrinsic value and essentialism allows for planning better spatial interventions that align with the human-centered approach to urban development. View Full-Text
Keywords: cultural heritage; intrinsic value; essentialism; essentialist and anti-essentialist place; intervention in park; urban garden cultural heritage; intrinsic value; essentialism; essentialist and anti-essentialist place; intervention in park; urban garden
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MDPI and ACS Style

Roszczynska-Kurasinska, M.; Domaradzka, A.; Wnuk, A.; Oleksy, T. Intrinsic Value and Perceived Essentialism of Culture Heritage Sites as Tools for Planning Interventions. Sustainability 2021, 13, 5078. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095078

AMA Style

Roszczynska-Kurasinska M, Domaradzka A, Wnuk A, Oleksy T. Intrinsic Value and Perceived Essentialism of Culture Heritage Sites as Tools for Planning Interventions. Sustainability. 2021; 13(9):5078. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095078

Chicago/Turabian Style

Roszczynska-Kurasinska, Magdalena, Anna Domaradzka, Anna Wnuk, and Tomasz Oleksy. 2021. "Intrinsic Value and Perceived Essentialism of Culture Heritage Sites as Tools for Planning Interventions" Sustainability 13, no. 9: 5078. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13095078

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