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Funding Campus Sustainability through a Green Fee—Estimating Students’ Willingness to Pay

O’Malley School of Business, Manhattan College, 4513 Manhattan College Pkwy, DLS 422, Riverdale, NY 10471, USA
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Academic Editors: Marc A. Rosen, Elena de la Poza and Javier Orozco-Messana
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2528; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052528
Received: 31 December 2020 / Revised: 15 February 2021 / Accepted: 19 February 2021 / Published: 26 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Promoting Sustainability in Higher Education)
Many higher education institutions promote sustainability by instilling environmental awareness within college students, the innovators of the future. As higher education institutions face budgetary constraints to achieve greener campuses, green fees have emerged as an alternative method for universities to encourage student participation and overall campus sustainability. A green fee is a mandatory student fee that funds sustainability projects on campus and is typically managed by a group of students and faculty. We are the first to assess students’ support for a mandatory green using a single dichotomous choice, contingent valuation question and estimating the willingness to pay to fund campus sustainability using a discrete choice model. Using results from a survey at a private college in New York City, we found more support for $5 and $10 green fee values. Using both parametric and non-parametric estimation methods, we found that mean and median willingness-to-pay values were between $13 and $15 and between $10 and $18, respectively. We suggest implementing a green fee between $10 and $13 following the lower values of the non-parametric median willingness to pay (WTP) range estimates that do not rely on distributional assumptions. We hope that other academic institutions follow our research steps to assess the support for a green fee and to suggest a green fee value for their institutions. View Full-Text
Keywords: green fee; discrete choice; contingent valuation; green campus; sustainability green fee; discrete choice; contingent valuation; green campus; sustainability
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MDPI and ACS Style

González-Ramírez, J.; Cheng, H.; Arral, S. Funding Campus Sustainability through a Green Fee—Estimating Students’ Willingness to Pay. Sustainability 2021, 13, 2528. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052528

AMA Style

González-Ramírez J, Cheng H, Arral S. Funding Campus Sustainability through a Green Fee—Estimating Students’ Willingness to Pay. Sustainability. 2021; 13(5):2528. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052528

Chicago/Turabian Style

González-Ramírez, Jimena; Cheng, Heyi; Arral, Sierra. 2021. "Funding Campus Sustainability through a Green Fee—Estimating Students’ Willingness to Pay" Sustainability 13, no. 5: 2528. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052528

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