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Article

East Africa’s Policy and Stakeholder Integration of Informal Operators in Electric Mobility Transitions—Kigali, Nairobi, Kisumu and Dar es Salaam

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Habitat Unit, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin, Germany
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UEMI Africa Living Labs, Urban Electric Mobility Initiative (UEMI), 10437 Berlin, Germany
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Centre of Excellence in Transport Planning, Engineering and Logistics, College of Science and Technology, University of Rwanda, P.O. Box 3900, Kigali, Rwanda
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Spatial Planning Department, Swedish School of Planning, Blekinge Institute of Technology, 371 41 Karlskrona, Sweden
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Mobility and International Cooperation, Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy, 10178 Berlin, Germany
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Aoife Ahern
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 1703; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041703
Received: 31 December 2020 / Revised: 27 January 2021 / Accepted: 27 January 2021 / Published: 4 February 2021
Electric mobility is beginning to enter East African cities. This paper aims to investigate what policy-level solutions and stakeholder constellations are established in the context of electric mobility (e-mobility) in Dar es Salaam, Kigali, Kisumu and Nairobi and in which ways they attempt to tackle the implementation of electric mobility solutions. The study employs two key methods including content analysis of policy and programmatic documents and interviews based on a purposive sampling approach with stakeholders involved in mobility transitions. The study findings point out that in spite of the growing number of policies (specifically in Rwanda and Kenya) and on-the-ground developments, a set of financial and technical barriers persists. These include high upfront investment costs in vehicles and infrastructure, as well as perceived lack of competitiveness with fossil fuel vehicles that constrain the uptake of e-mobility initiatives. The study further indicates that transport operators and their representative associations are less recognized as major players in the transition, far behind new e-mobility players (start-ups) and public authorities. This study concludes by identifying current gaps that need to be tackled by policymakers and stakeholders in order to implement inclusive electric mobility in East African cities, considering modalities that include transport providers and address their financial constraints. View Full-Text
Keywords: electric mobility; paratransit; informality; transportation; East Africa electric mobility; paratransit; informality; transportation; East Africa
MDPI and ACS Style

Galuszka, J.; Martin, E.; Nkurunziza, A.; Achieng’ Oginga, J.; Senyagwa, J.; Teko, E.; Lah, O. East Africa’s Policy and Stakeholder Integration of Informal Operators in Electric Mobility Transitions—Kigali, Nairobi, Kisumu and Dar es Salaam. Sustainability 2021, 13, 1703. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041703

AMA Style

Galuszka J, Martin E, Nkurunziza A, Achieng’ Oginga J, Senyagwa J, Teko E, Lah O. East Africa’s Policy and Stakeholder Integration of Informal Operators in Electric Mobility Transitions—Kigali, Nairobi, Kisumu and Dar es Salaam. Sustainability. 2021; 13(4):1703. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041703

Chicago/Turabian Style

Galuszka, Jakub, Emilie Martin, Alphonse Nkurunziza, Judith Achieng’ Oginga, Jacqueline Senyagwa, Edmund Teko, and Oliver Lah. 2021. "East Africa’s Policy and Stakeholder Integration of Informal Operators in Electric Mobility Transitions—Kigali, Nairobi, Kisumu and Dar es Salaam" Sustainability 13, no. 4: 1703. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041703

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