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Article

The Climate Just City

by 1,2,3,* and 1
1
The Centre for Societal Risk Research and Political Science, Karlstad University, 651 88 Karlstad, Sweden
2
The Centre for Natural Hazards and Disaster Science, Uppsala University, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden
3
The Centre for Urban Research, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ingemar Elander
Sustainability 2021, 13(3), 1201; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031201
Received: 1 January 2021 / Revised: 20 January 2021 / Accepted: 21 January 2021 / Published: 24 January 2021
Cities are increasingly impacted by climate change, driving the need for adaptation and sustainable development. Local and global economic and socio-cultural influence are also driving city redevelopment. This, fundamentally political, development highlights issues of who pays and who gains, who decides and how, and who/what is to be valued. Climate change adaptation has primarily been informed by science, but the adaptation discourse has widened to include the social sciences, subjecting adaptation practices to political analysis and critique. In this article, we critically discuss the just city concept in a climate adaptation context. We develop the just city concept by describing and discussing key theoretical themes in a politically and justice-oriented analysis of climate change adaptation in cities. We illustrate our arguments by looking at recent case studies of climate change adaptation in three very different city contexts: Port Vila, Baltimore City, and Karlstad. We conclude that the social context with its power asymmetries must be given a central position in understanding the distribution of climate risks and vulnerabilities when studying climate change adaptation in cities from a climate justice perspective. View Full-Text
Keywords: just city; climate just city; ‘the right to the city’; climate change adaptation; power; equity; urban planning just city; climate just city; ‘the right to the city’; climate change adaptation; power; equity; urban planning
MDPI and ACS Style

Granberg, M.; Glover, L. The Climate Just City. Sustainability 2021, 13, 1201. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031201

AMA Style

Granberg M, Glover L. The Climate Just City. Sustainability. 2021; 13(3):1201. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031201

Chicago/Turabian Style

Granberg, Mikael, and Leigh Glover. 2021. "The Climate Just City" Sustainability 13, no. 3: 1201. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13031201

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