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Economic Impact Analysis of Farmers’ Markets in the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area: Evidence of a Circular Economy
Article

Farmers’ Market Usage, Fruit and Vegetable Consumption, Meals at Home and Health–Evidence from Washington, DC

1
Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC 20001, USA
2
Department of Natural Sciences and Engineering, Prince George’s Community College, Largo, MD 20774, USA
3
Center for Sustainable Development, University of the District of Columbia, Washington, DC 20008, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Sabine O’hara and Dilip Nandwani
Sustainability 2021, 13(13), 7437; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137437
Received: 11 May 2021 / Revised: 18 June 2021 / Accepted: 24 June 2021 / Published: 2 July 2021
Using a survey of 440 residents in Washington, DC metropolitan area conducted in 2018, we empirically examined the causal relationship between farmers’ market usage and indicators of health, such as fruit and vegetable consumption, meal preparation time, meals away from home, and body mass index (BMI). On average, we found that a one percent increase in farmers’ market usage increases consumers’ fruit and vegetable consumption by 6.5 percent (p < 0.01) and daily time spent on meal preparing by 9.4 percent (p < 0.05). These impacts were enhanced by 2SLS models with instrumental variables which indicates causal effects. Farmers’ market usage is also associated with decreased amount of meals away from home (p < 0.05). We also found qualitative evidence that shopping at farmers’ markets improves access to and increases consumption of healthy food. However, we did not find that farmers’ market usage has statistical association with grocery shopper’s body mass index. Our study established causality that farmers’ market usage positively impacts consumers’ fruit and vegetable consumption and meals at home. It provided concrete evidence for interventions aiming to increase dietary consumption and promote healthy eating habits through farmers’ markets. View Full-Text
Keywords: famers market; fruit and vegetable consumption; meals away from home; body mass index; food environment famers market; fruit and vegetable consumption; meals away from home; body mass index; food environment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hu, X.; Clarke, L.W.; Zendehdel, K. Farmers’ Market Usage, Fruit and Vegetable Consumption, Meals at Home and Health–Evidence from Washington, DC. Sustainability 2021, 13, 7437. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137437

AMA Style

Hu X, Clarke LW, Zendehdel K. Farmers’ Market Usage, Fruit and Vegetable Consumption, Meals at Home and Health–Evidence from Washington, DC. Sustainability. 2021; 13(13):7437. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137437

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hu, Xiaochu, Lorraine W. Clarke, and Kamran Zendehdel. 2021. "Farmers’ Market Usage, Fruit and Vegetable Consumption, Meals at Home and Health–Evidence from Washington, DC" Sustainability 13, no. 13: 7437. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13137437

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