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Article

Designation of Origin Distillates in Mexico: Value Chains and Territorial Development

1
Facultad de Responsabilidad Social, Universidad Anáhuac Mexico, Huixquilucan 52786, Mexico
2
Faculty of Superior Studies Acatlán, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, Naucalpan de Juárez 53150, Mexico
3
Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad Panamericana, Augusto Rodin 498, Ciudad de Mexico 03920, Mexico
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Giovanni Belletti, Andrea Marescotti and François Casabianca
Sustainability 2021, 13(10), 5496; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105496
Received: 23 February 2021 / Revised: 19 April 2021 / Accepted: 29 April 2021 / Published: 14 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geographical Indications, Public Goods, and Sustainable Development)
Geographical Indications (GI) have been used in several countries, mainly in Europe, as tools to promote territorial development. These tools have been adopted in Latin American countries without serious reflection on their scope, limits, and advantages. One of the most relevant elements therein corresponds to the way in which these assets participate in value chains, whether short or long, which has important implications for governance, benefit distribution, geographic organization of value accumulation processes, among others. With that in mind, we identify the two most relevant Mexican GIs—namely Designation of Origin Tequila (DOT) and Designation of Origin Mezcal (DOM)—to analyze how their value chains have been constructed and their impact on territorial development. We conclude that GIs tend to adopt large value chains to satisfy long-distance demand, but they can have negative territorial effects if institutions are not strong enough to appropriately incorporate territorial stakeholders’ demands. View Full-Text
Keywords: designation of origin; Mexico; global value chains; territorial development designation of origin; Mexico; global value chains; territorial development
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pérez-Akaki, P.; Vega-Vera, N.V.; Enríquez-Caballero, Y.P.; Velázquez-Salazar, M. Designation of Origin Distillates in Mexico: Value Chains and Territorial Development. Sustainability 2021, 13, 5496. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105496

AMA Style

Pérez-Akaki P, Vega-Vera NV, Enríquez-Caballero YP, Velázquez-Salazar M. Designation of Origin Distillates in Mexico: Value Chains and Territorial Development. Sustainability. 2021; 13(10):5496. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105496

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pérez-Akaki, Pablo, Nadia V. Vega-Vera, Yuritzi P. Enríquez-Caballero, and Marisol Velázquez-Salazar. 2021. "Designation of Origin Distillates in Mexico: Value Chains and Territorial Development" Sustainability 13, no. 10: 5496. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105496

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