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Article

Addressing the Social Vulnerability of Mississippi Gulf Coast Vietnamese Community through the Development of Community Health Advisors

1
School of Health Professions, The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 39406, USA
2
BPSOS-Biloxi-Bayou La Batre, Biloxi, MS 39530, USA
3
BPSOS, Community Health Worker, Biloxi, MS 39530, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3892; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093892
Received: 26 March 2020 / Revised: 30 April 2020 / Accepted: 3 May 2020 / Published: 10 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Catastrophes)
Background: Resiliency is the ability to prepare for, recover from, and adapt to stressors from adverse events. Social vulnerabilities (limited access to resources, political power, and representation; lack of social capital; aspects of the built environment; health inequities; and being in certain demographic categories) can impact resiliency. The Vietnamese population living along the Mississippi Gulf Coast is a community that has unique social vulnerabilities that impact their ability to be resilient to adverse events. Objectives: The purpose of this project was to address social vulnerability by implementing and evaluating a volunteer Community Health Advisor (CHA) project to enhance community resiliency in this community. Methods: A program implemented over eight three-hour sessions was adapted from the Community Health Advisor Network curriculum that focused on healthy eating, preventing chronic conditions (hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, cancer, and poor mental health). Topics also included leadership and capacity development skills. Results: Participants (n = 22) ranged from 35 to 84 years of age. Most were female (63.6%), married (45.5%), unemployed (63.6%), had annual incomes of <$10,000, and had high school diplomas (68.2%). Community concerns were crime (50.0%), volunteerism (40.0%), language barriers (35.0%), and food insecurity (30.0%). Approximately 75% had experienced war trauma and/or refugee camps, and 10% had experienced domestic violence. Scores on the Community Health Advisor Core Competency Assessment increased from pre-test to post-test (t = −5.962, df = 11, p < 0.0001), as did SF-8 scores (t = 5.759, df = 17, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Strategies to reduce vulnerabilities in the Vietnamese community should include developing interventions that address health risks and strengths and focus on root causes of vulnerability. View Full-Text
Keywords: Vietnamese; vulnerability; resilience; Community Health Advisor Vietnamese; vulnerability; resilience; Community Health Advisor
MDPI and ACS Style

Mayfield-Johnson, S.; Fastring, D.; Le, D.; Nguyen, J. Addressing the Social Vulnerability of Mississippi Gulf Coast Vietnamese Community through the Development of Community Health Advisors. Sustainability 2020, 12, 3892. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093892

AMA Style

Mayfield-Johnson S, Fastring D, Le D, Nguyen J. Addressing the Social Vulnerability of Mississippi Gulf Coast Vietnamese Community through the Development of Community Health Advisors. Sustainability. 2020; 12(9):3892. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093892

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mayfield-Johnson, Susan, Danielle Fastring, Daniel Le, and Jane Nguyen. 2020. "Addressing the Social Vulnerability of Mississippi Gulf Coast Vietnamese Community through the Development of Community Health Advisors" Sustainability 12, no. 9: 3892. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093892

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