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Article

Interlinking Bristol Based Models to Build Resilience to Climate Change

1
Bristol City Council, Strategic City Transport, Flood Risk Management Team, 100 Temple Street, Bristol BS3 9FS, UK
2
Wessex Water, Engineering & Construction, Claverton Down Rd, Bath BA2 7WW, UK
3
Centre for Water Systems, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF, UK
4
IREC, Power Systems Department, Jardins de les Dones de Negre, 1, 2ª pl., Sant Adrià de Besòs, 08930 Barcelona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(8), 3233; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083233
Received: 31 January 2020 / Revised: 8 April 2020 / Accepted: 9 April 2020 / Published: 16 April 2020
Expanding populations and increased urbanisation are causing a strain on cities worldwide as they become more frequently and more severely affected by extreme weather conditions. Critical services and infrastructure are feeling increasing pressure to be maintained in a sustainable way under these combined stresses. Methods to better cope with these demanding factors are greatly needed now, and with the predicted impacts of climate change, further adaptation will become essential for the future. All cities comprise a complex of interdependent systems representing critical operations that cannot function properly independently, or be fully understood in isolation of one another. The consequences of localised flooding can become much more widespread due to the inter-relation of these connected systems. Due to reliance upon one another and this connectedness, an all-encompassing assessment is appropriate. Different model representations are available for different services and integrating these enables consideration of these cascading effects. In the case study city of Bristol, 1D and 2D hydraulic modelling predicting the location and severity of flooding has been used in conjunction with modelling of road traffic and energy supply by linking models established for these respective sectors. This enables identification of key vulnerabilities to prioritise resources and enhance city resilience against future sea-level rise and the more intense rainfall conditions anticipated. View Full-Text
Keywords: fluvial; pluvial; tidal; sewer; flood; risk; climate change; modelling; cascading effects fluvial; pluvial; tidal; sewer; flood; risk; climate change; modelling; cascading effects
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stevens, J.; Henderson, R.; Webber, J.; Evans, B.; Chen, A.; Djordjević, S.; Sánchez-Muñoz, D.; Domínguez-García, J. Interlinking Bristol Based Models to Build Resilience to Climate Change. Sustainability 2020, 12, 3233. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083233

AMA Style

Stevens J, Henderson R, Webber J, Evans B, Chen A, Djordjević S, Sánchez-Muñoz D, Domínguez-García J. Interlinking Bristol Based Models to Build Resilience to Climate Change. Sustainability. 2020; 12(8):3233. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083233

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stevens, John, Rob Henderson, James Webber, Barry Evans, Albert Chen, Slobodan Djordjević, Daniel Sánchez-Muñoz, and José Domínguez-García. 2020. "Interlinking Bristol Based Models to Build Resilience to Climate Change" Sustainability 12, no. 8: 3233. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12083233

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