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Article

Transitioning European Protein-Rich Food Consumption and Production towards More Sustainable Patterns—Strategies and Policy Suggestions

1
International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), KG 563 Kigali, Rwanda
2
Department of Agricultural Economics, Statistics and Business Management, ETSIAAB, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Av. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain
3
CEIGRAM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), C/ Senda del Rey 13, 28040 Madrid, Spain
4
Department of Applied Mathematics, ETSIAAB, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), Av. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1962; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051962
Received: 26 January 2020 / Revised: 25 February 2020 / Accepted: 29 February 2020 / Published: 4 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Sovereignty, Food Security, and Sustainable Food Production)
Global and European diets have shifted towards greater consumption of animal proteins. Recent studies urge reversals of these trends and call for a rapid transition towards adoption of more plant-based diets. This paper explored mechanisms to increase the production and consumption of plant-proteins in Europe by 2030, using participatory backcasting. We identified pathways to the future (strategies), as well as interim milestones, barriers, opportunities and actions, with key European stakeholders in the agri-food chain. Results show that four strategies could be implemented to achieve the desired future: increased research and development, enriched consumer education and awareness, improved and connected supply and value chains and public policy supports. Actions needed to reach milestones were required immediately, reinforcing the need for urgent actions to tackle the protein challenge. This study concretely detailed how idealized dietary futures can be achieved in a real-world context. It can support EU protein transition by informing policy makers and the broader public on potential ways to move towards a more sustainable plant-based future. The outputs of this analysis have the potential to be combined with dietary scenarios to develop more temporally explicit models of future dietary changes and how to reach them. View Full-Text
Keywords: future; meat substitution; plant proteins; stakeholders; backcasting; pathways future; meat substitution; plant proteins; stakeholders; backcasting; pathways
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MDPI and ACS Style

Manners, R.; Blanco-Gutiérrez, I.; Varela-Ortega, C.; Tarquis, A.M. Transitioning European Protein-Rich Food Consumption and Production towards More Sustainable Patterns—Strategies and Policy Suggestions. Sustainability 2020, 12, 1962. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051962

AMA Style

Manners R, Blanco-Gutiérrez I, Varela-Ortega C, Tarquis AM. Transitioning European Protein-Rich Food Consumption and Production towards More Sustainable Patterns—Strategies and Policy Suggestions. Sustainability. 2020; 12(5):1962. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051962

Chicago/Turabian Style

Manners, Rhys, Irene Blanco-Gutiérrez, Consuelo Varela-Ortega, and Ana M. Tarquis 2020. "Transitioning European Protein-Rich Food Consumption and Production towards More Sustainable Patterns—Strategies and Policy Suggestions" Sustainability 12, no. 5: 1962. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051962

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