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Open AccessArticle

Technological Ecosystems in Citizen Science: A Framework to Involve Children and Young People

1
GRIAL Research Group, Computer Science Department, University of Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca, Spain
2
Nexus Research, D18 Y1K0 Dublin, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(5), 1863; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051863
Received: 24 December 2019 / Revised: 26 February 2020 / Accepted: 26 February 2020 / Published: 1 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Opportunities and Challenges for the Future of Open Education)
Young people are distinguished as a social group with the capacity to drive new behaviours and understandings in today’s society. However, most young people consider that people in charge of decision-making processes are not addressing their concerns. The WYRED project proposes a framework for citizen science based on a technological ecosystem to promote the transfer of perspectives, ideas, and knowledge among young people and decision-makers on issues related to the digital society. The work goal is to analyse the model proposed through a citizen science case study centred in identifying the ideas and opinions of children and young people between 7 and 30 years old, concerning gender stereotypes on the Internet. A total of 69 children and young people from Belgium, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Ukraine, and the United Kingdom have interacted for two weeks in a private space guaranteed by the defined ecosystem. The results of the analysis of the interaction between young people and facilitators (with different profiles: educators, researchers and decision-makers) demonstrate that the use of technological ecosystems to sustain the development of citizen science projects allows for the improvement of knowledge transfer processes between children and young people with stakeholders, as well as the analysis of these processes. View Full-Text
Keywords: citizen science; open science; digital society; gender stereotypes; decision making; young people; technological ecosystem; knowledge management; virtual communities citizen science; open science; digital society; gender stereotypes; decision making; young people; technological ecosystem; knowledge management; virtual communities
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MDPI and ACS Style

García-Holgado, A.; García-Peñalvo, F.J.; Butler, P. Technological Ecosystems in Citizen Science: A Framework to Involve Children and Young People. Sustainability 2020, 12, 1863. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051863

AMA Style

García-Holgado A, García-Peñalvo FJ, Butler P. Technological Ecosystems in Citizen Science: A Framework to Involve Children and Young People. Sustainability. 2020; 12(5):1863. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051863

Chicago/Turabian Style

García-Holgado, Alicia; García-Peñalvo, Francisco J.; Butler, Paul. 2020. "Technological Ecosystems in Citizen Science: A Framework to Involve Children and Young People" Sustainability 12, no. 5: 1863. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12051863

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