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Article

Robotic Restaurant Marketing Strategies in the Era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Focusing on Perceived Innovativeness

1
The College of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwanjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747, Korea
2
Department of Tourism Management, College of Economics and Business Administration, Daegu University, Daegu, Kyungsansi, Kyungsangbukdo 38453, Korea
3
Seoulland F&B, 181, Gwangmyeong-ro, Gwacheon-si, Gyeonggi-do 13829, Korea
4
Department of Tourism and Convention, Pusan National University, Busan 43241, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 9165; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219165
Received: 7 October 2020 / Revised: 18 October 2020 / Accepted: 21 October 2020 / Published: 4 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Big Data and Sustainability in the Tourism Industry)
Although innovative robotic technology plays an important role in the restaurant industry, there is not much research on it. Thus, this study tried to identify how to form behavioral intentions using the concept of perceived innovativeness in the context of robotic restaurants for the first time. A research model comprising 12 hypotheses is evaluated using structural equation modeling based on a sample of 418 subjects in South Korea. The data analysis results show that perceived innovativeness is an important predictor of the customers’ attitude, which in turn has a significant effect on desire. In addition, desire exerts a positive influence on intentions to use and willingness to pay more. Lastly, perceived risk moderates the relationships between (1) desire and intentions to use and (2) desire and willingness to pay more. Based on the above statistical results, important theoretical and managerial implications are presented. View Full-Text
Keywords: robotic restaurants; perceived innovativeness; perceived risk; attitude; behavioral intentions robotic restaurants; perceived innovativeness; perceived risk; attitude; behavioral intentions
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hwang, J.; Lee, K.-W.; Kim, D.; Kim, I. Robotic Restaurant Marketing Strategies in the Era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Focusing on Perceived Innovativeness. Sustainability 2020, 12, 9165. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219165

AMA Style

Hwang J, Lee K-W, Kim D, Kim I. Robotic Restaurant Marketing Strategies in the Era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Focusing on Perceived Innovativeness. Sustainability. 2020; 12(21):9165. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219165

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hwang, Jinsoo, Kwang-Woo Lee, Dohyung Kim, and Insin Kim. 2020. "Robotic Restaurant Marketing Strategies in the Era of the Fourth Industrial Revolution: Focusing on Perceived Innovativeness" Sustainability 12, no. 21: 9165. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219165

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