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Article

Assessment of the Impact of the Spatial Extent of Land Subsidence and Aquifer System Drainage Induced by Underground Mining

The Department of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering, AGH University of Science and Technology, 30-059 Kraków, Poland
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Sustainability 2020, 12(19), 7871; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12197871
Received: 13 August 2020 / Revised: 20 September 2020 / Accepted: 21 September 2020 / Published: 23 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Contributions of Geological Research to Sustainability)
The environmental impact assessment of underground mining usually includes the direct effects of exploitation. These are damage to rock mass and land subsidence. Continuous dewatering of the aquifer system is, however, necessary to carry out underground mining operations. Consequently, the drainage of the aquifer system is observed at a regional scale. The spatial extent of the phenomenon is typically much wider than the direct impact of the exploitation. The research presented was, therefore, aimed at evaluating both the direct and the indirect effects of underground mining. Firstly, the spatial extent of land subsidence was determined based on the Knothe theory. Secondly, underground mining-induced drainage of the aquifers was modeled. The 3D finite-difference hydrogeological model was constructed based on the conventional groundwater flow theory. The values of model hydrogeological parameters were determined based on literature and empirical data. These data were also used for model calibration. Finally, the results of the calculations were compared successfully with the field data. The research results presented indicate that underground mining’s indirect effects cover a much larger area than direct effects. Thus, underground mining requires a broader environmental assessment. Our results can, therefore, pave the way for more efficient management of groundwater considering underground mining. View Full-Text
Keywords: groundwater; underground mining; aquifer system; drainage; modeling groundwater; underground mining; aquifer system; drainage; modeling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Guzy, A.; Malinowska, A.A. Assessment of the Impact of the Spatial Extent of Land Subsidence and Aquifer System Drainage Induced by Underground Mining. Sustainability 2020, 12, 7871. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12197871

AMA Style

Guzy A, Malinowska AA. Assessment of the Impact of the Spatial Extent of Land Subsidence and Aquifer System Drainage Induced by Underground Mining. Sustainability. 2020; 12(19):7871. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12197871

Chicago/Turabian Style

Guzy, Artur, and Agnieszka A. Malinowska 2020. "Assessment of the Impact of the Spatial Extent of Land Subsidence and Aquifer System Drainage Induced by Underground Mining" Sustainability 12, no. 19: 7871. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12197871

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