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A Rational Decision-Making Process with Public Engagement for Designing Public Transport Services: A Real Case Application in Italy
Article

Strong Sustainability in Public Transport Policies: An e-Mobility Bus Fleet Application in Sorrento Peninsula (Italy)

1
Department of Engineering, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, 81031 Aversa, Italy
2
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples “Federico II”, 80125 Napoli, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 7033; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12177033
Received: 9 July 2020 / Revised: 20 August 2020 / Accepted: 25 August 2020 / Published: 28 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Sustainability in Urban Transportation Planning)
Sustainability can be defined as the capacity to satisfy current needs without compromising future generations. Sustainable development clashes with the transport sector because of the latter’s high fossil fuels usage, consumption of natural resources and emission of pollutant and greenhouse gases. Electric mobility seems to be one of the best options to achieve both the sustainability goals and the mobility needs. This paper critically analysed weaknesses, strengths and application fields of electric mobility, proposing a real case application of an e-mobility bus fleet in Sorrento peninsula (Italy). The aim and the originality of this research was to propose a public transport design methodology based on a “strong sustainability” policy and applied to a real case study. To be precise, the renewing of the “old” bus fleet with a diesel plug-in hybrid one charged by a photovoltaic system was proposed, aiming to both improve environmental sustainability and perform an investment return for a private operator in managing the transport service. The proposed case study is particularly suitable because the peculiar morphology of the Sorrento peninsula in Italy does not allow other types of public transport services (e.g., rail, metro). Furthermore, this area, rich in UNESCO sites, has always been an international tourist destination because of the environment and landscape. Estimation results show that the new e-mobility bus service will be able to reduce the greenhouse gases emissions up to the 23%, with a financial payback period of 10 years for a private investor. View Full-Text
Keywords: e-mobility; electric vehicle; plug-in hybrid; strong sustainability; weak sustainability; MaaS; sustainable mobility; new technologies; local emissions; environmental impacts; revenue-cost analysis e-mobility; electric vehicle; plug-in hybrid; strong sustainability; weak sustainability; MaaS; sustainable mobility; new technologies; local emissions; environmental impacts; revenue-cost analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cartenì, A.; Henke, I.; Molitierno, C.; Di Francesco, L. Strong Sustainability in Public Transport Policies: An e-Mobility Bus Fleet Application in Sorrento Peninsula (Italy). Sustainability 2020, 12, 7033. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12177033

AMA Style

Cartenì A, Henke I, Molitierno C, Di Francesco L. Strong Sustainability in Public Transport Policies: An e-Mobility Bus Fleet Application in Sorrento Peninsula (Italy). Sustainability. 2020; 12(17):7033. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12177033

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cartenì, Armando, Ilaria Henke, Clorinda Molitierno, and Luigi Di Francesco. 2020. "Strong Sustainability in Public Transport Policies: An e-Mobility Bus Fleet Application in Sorrento Peninsula (Italy)" Sustainability 12, no. 17: 7033. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12177033

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