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Article

Understanding Barriers in Indian Ocean Tuna Commission Allocation Negotiations on Fishing Opportunities

Marine Affairs Program, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
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Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6665; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166665
Received: 24 June 2020 / Revised: 28 July 2020 / Accepted: 11 August 2020 / Published: 18 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Fisheries Economics and Management)
Tuna Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs) have been given an arduous mandate under the legal framework of the United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement. Member states with different interests and objectives are required to cooperate and collaborate on the conservation and management of tuna and tuna-like species, which includes the allocation of fishing opportunities. It is well understood that the main RFMO allocation disagreements are the inability to agree on a total allowable catch, the lack of willingness to accept new members, disagreement on who should bear the conservation burden, and non-compliance with national allocations owning to perceived inequities. Addressing these elements is crucial for any organization if it is to sustain its credibility stability and legitimacy. This paper identifies additional barriers facing an equitable allocation process at the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission (IOTC). These challenges are multi-faceted and include institutional, political, and scientific barriers in the ongoing allocation negotiations, and further inhibit effective negotiation and resolution adoption as a whole. After almost 10 years of negotiations, the process has progressed little, and without agreement on these barriers it will be a challenge to adopt a stable systematic allocation process. View Full-Text
Keywords: fishery management; equity; tuna governance; Indian Ocean Tuna Commission; tuna allocation; marine policy fishery management; equity; tuna governance; Indian Ocean Tuna Commission; tuna allocation; marine policy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sinan, H.; Bailey, M. Understanding Barriers in Indian Ocean Tuna Commission Allocation Negotiations on Fishing Opportunities. Sustainability 2020, 12, 6665. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166665

AMA Style

Sinan H, Bailey M. Understanding Barriers in Indian Ocean Tuna Commission Allocation Negotiations on Fishing Opportunities. Sustainability. 2020; 12(16):6665. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166665

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sinan, Hussain, and Megan Bailey. 2020. "Understanding Barriers in Indian Ocean Tuna Commission Allocation Negotiations on Fishing Opportunities" Sustainability 12, no. 16: 6665. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166665

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