Next Article in Journal
Sustainable Perspective of Low-Lime Stabilized Fly Ashes for Geotechnical Applications: PROMETHEE-Based Optimization Approach
Next Article in Special Issue
Making STEM Education Objectives Sustainable through a Tutoring Program
Previous Article in Journal
Exploring the Initial Impact of COVID-19 Sentiment on US Stock Market Using Big Data
Previous Article in Special Issue
Uses of ICT Tools from the Perspective of Chilean University Teachers
 
 
Article

Influence of Smartphone Use on Emotional, Cognitive and Educational Dimensions in University Students

1
Department of Educational and Developmental Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Granada, Campus Universitario de Cartuja, 18071 Granada, Spain
2
Faculty of Psychology, University of Granada, Campus Universitario de Cartuja, 18071 Granada, Spain
3
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Granada, 18016 Granada, Spain
4
Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (ibs.GRANADA), 18014 Granada, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6646; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166646
Received: 28 July 2020 / Revised: 9 August 2020 / Accepted: 13 August 2020 / Published: 17 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teacher Training in Active Methodologies for Ecosystem Learning)
The use of mobile devices is one of the increasingly interactive methodologies widely promoted within the European Higher Education Area. It is, therefore, necessary to determine the potential effects of their excessive use on psychological and educational variables. The aim of the present study was to assess smartphone addiction and its relationship with emotional, cognitive, and educational dimensions in university students. Participants comprised 144 university students aged between 19 and 27 years old and studying psychology and education at the University of Granada. Various tests were administered to assess variables grouped into the following dimensions: smartphone addiction (TDM), general intelligence (Wonderlic), emotional intelligence (TMMS-24), motivation (Mape-3), creativity (CREA test), and attitudes toward competencies. An ex post facto design was employed. Direct associations were observed between addiction symptoms caused by smartphone use (withdrawal, tolerance, excessive use, and problems caused by the same) and the variables of extrinsic motivation (fear and avoidance of the task) and intrinsic motivation (motivation toward the task). The results also indicated direct relationships between the problems caused by excessive smartphone use and anxiety and extrinsic motivation toward learning. An inverse relationship was observed between smartphone addiction and the emotional intelligence dimension of clarity of feelings. The anxiety provoked by excessive smartphone use was related to the tolerance generated by such use and to cultural and artistic competencies. The data obtained thus shed light on the effect of smartphone use on emotional, cognitive, and educational dimensions in university settings. View Full-Text
Keywords: addiction; competencies; creativity; emotional intelligence; smartphone addiction; competencies; creativity; emotional intelligence; smartphone
MDPI and ACS Style

Morales Rodríguez, F.M.; Lozano, J.M.G.; Linares Mingorance, P.; Pérez-Mármol, J.M. Influence of Smartphone Use on Emotional, Cognitive and Educational Dimensions in University Students. Sustainability 2020, 12, 6646. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166646

AMA Style

Morales Rodríguez FM, Lozano JMG, Linares Mingorance P, Pérez-Mármol JM. Influence of Smartphone Use on Emotional, Cognitive and Educational Dimensions in University Students. Sustainability. 2020; 12(16):6646. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166646

Chicago/Turabian Style

Morales Rodríguez, Francisco Manuel, José Miguel Giménez Lozano, Pablo Linares Mingorance, and José Manuel Pérez-Mármol. 2020. "Influence of Smartphone Use on Emotional, Cognitive and Educational Dimensions in University Students" Sustainability 12, no. 16: 6646. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166646

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop