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Article

Monitoring Bioeconomy Transitions with Economic–Environmental and Innovation Indicators: Addressing Data Gaps in the Short Term

1
Technology Assessment and Substance Cycles, Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Bioeconomy e.V. (ATB), 14469 Potsdam, Germany
2
Business Unit Bioeconomy and Life Sciences, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research ISI, 76139 Karlsruhe, Germany
3
ifo Center for Energy, Climate, and Resources, ifo Institute, 81679 München, Germany
4
Department of Agricultural Economics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 10099 Berlin, Germany
5
nova-Institute GmbH, 50354 Hürth, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4683; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114683
Received: 7 May 2020 / Revised: 29 May 2020 / Accepted: 2 June 2020 / Published: 8 June 2020
Monitoring bioeconomy transitions and their effects can be considered a Herculean task, as they cannot be easily captured using current economic statistics. Distinctions are rarely made between bio-based and non-bio-based products when official data is collected. However, production along bioeconomy supply chains and its implications for sustainability require measurement and assessment to enable considered policymaking. We propose a starting point for monitoring bioeconomy transitions by suggesting an adapted framework, relevant sectors, and indicators that can be observed with existing information and data from many alternative sources, assuming that official data collection methods will not be modified soon. Economic–environmental indicators and innovation indicators are derived for the German surfactant industry based on the premise that combined economic–environmental indicators can show actual developments and trade-offs, while innovation indicators can reveal whether a bioeconomy transition is likely in a sector. Methodological challenges are discussed and low-cost; high-benefit options for further data collection are recommended. View Full-Text
Keywords: Bioeconomy monitoring; transition framework; surfactant industry; bio-based share; fossil resource substitution; diffusion of innovations Bioeconomy monitoring; transition framework; surfactant industry; bio-based share; fossil resource substitution; diffusion of innovations
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jander, W.; Wydra, S.; Wackerbauer, J.; Grundmann, P.; Piotrowski, S. Monitoring Bioeconomy Transitions with Economic–Environmental and Innovation Indicators: Addressing Data Gaps in the Short Term. Sustainability 2020, 12, 4683. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114683

AMA Style

Jander W, Wydra S, Wackerbauer J, Grundmann P, Piotrowski S. Monitoring Bioeconomy Transitions with Economic–Environmental and Innovation Indicators: Addressing Data Gaps in the Short Term. Sustainability. 2020; 12(11):4683. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114683

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jander, Wiebke, Sven Wydra, Johann Wackerbauer, Philipp Grundmann, and Stephan Piotrowski. 2020. "Monitoring Bioeconomy Transitions with Economic–Environmental and Innovation Indicators: Addressing Data Gaps in the Short Term" Sustainability 12, no. 11: 4683. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114683

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