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Towards a Sustainable Indoor Lighting Design: Effects of Artificial Light on the Emotional State of Adolescents in the Classroom

1
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Universidad San Pablo CEU, Campus Montepríncipe, Boadilla del Monte, 28925 Madrid, Spain
2
Faculty of Languages and Education. Campus de Princesa-Madrid. Universidad Antonio de Nebrija, 28015 Madrid, Spain
3
Architecture and Design Department, Escuela Politécnica Superior, Universidad San Pablo CEU, CEU Universities, Campus Montepríncipe, Boadilla del Monte, 28668 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(10), 4263; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12104263
Received: 29 April 2020 / Revised: 20 May 2020 / Accepted: 21 May 2020 / Published: 22 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Building and Indoor Air Quality)
In recent years, articles have been published on the non-visual effects of light, specifically the light emitted by the new luminaires with light emitting diodes (LEDs) and by the screens of televisions, computer equipment, and mobile phones. Professionals from the world of optometry have raised the possibility that the blue part of the visible light from sources that emit artificial light could have pernicious effects on the retina. The aim of this work is to analyze the articles published on this subject, and to use existing information to elucidate the spectral composition and irradiance of new LED luminaires for use in the home and in public spaces such as educational centers, as well as considering the consequences of the light emitted by laptops for teenagers. The results of this research show that the amount of blue light emitted by electronic equipment is lower than that emitted by modern luminaires and thousands of times less than solar irradiance. On the other hand, the latest research warns that these small amounts of light received at night can have pernicious non-visual effects on adolescents. The creation of new LED luminaires for interior lighting, including in educational centers, where the intensity of blue light can be increased without any specific legislation for its control, makes regulatory developments imperative due to the possible repercussions on adolescents with unknown and unpredictable consequences. View Full-Text
Keywords: natural lighting; visual comfort; artificial lighting; indoor lighting design; chronodisruption; circadian rhythms; daylighting; sustainable lighting design; LED luminaires; indoor environment quality; classroom lighting natural lighting; visual comfort; artificial lighting; indoor lighting design; chronodisruption; circadian rhythms; daylighting; sustainable lighting design; LED luminaires; indoor environment quality; classroom lighting
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Baeza Moyano, D.; San Juan Fernández, M.; González Lezcano, R.A. Towards a Sustainable Indoor Lighting Design: Effects of Artificial Light on the Emotional State of Adolescents in the Classroom. Sustainability 2020, 12, 4263.

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