Next Article in Journal
Northern Warning Lights: Ambiguities of Environmental Security in Finland and Sweden
Previous Article in Journal
Engineering eHeritage—A New Approach for Study of Intangible Cultural Heritage. Case Study: The Analysis of the Noise Produced by the Dacian Dracon
Previous Article in Special Issue
Harnessing Insights from Social-Ecological Systems Research for Monitoring Sustainable Development
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Sustainability 2019, 11(8), 2227; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11082227

Analyzing Spatial Congruencies and Mismatches between Supply, Demand and Flow of Ecosystem Services and Sustainable Development

1
Department of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestrasse 15, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
2
Institute for Alpine Environment, Eurac Research, Viale Druso 1, 39100 Bozen/Bolzano, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 March 2019 / Revised: 8 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 13 April 2019
  |  
PDF [2263 KB, uploaded 13 April 2019]
  |  

Abstract

Ecosystem services (ESs) are increasingly included into decision-making to achieve Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Although both concepts consider the interactions between humans and the environment, spatial relationships between ESs and sustainability have been rarely addressed. Therefore, this study aims at analyzing spatial congruencies and mismatches between ESs and sustainability in the greater Alpine region. Using hot spot and overlap analyses, we overlaid maps of supply, demand and flow of eight key ESs with the spatial distribution of sustainability based on 24 indicators. Our results reveal that, in most cases, supply of and demand for ESs are greatly dislocated. These mismatches are reflected also in the spatial distribution of sustainability. In contrast to ES demand hot spots, supply hot spots are generally characterized by high sustainability levels, especially in relation to the environment. However, due to discrepancies in the social and economic dimensions, it cannot be assumed that ES supply hot spots always correspond to high sustainability. Hence, using ES indicators for measuring sustainability provides rather limited insights. We conclude that both concepts should be applied in a complementary way to maximize ecological, social and economic benefits in land management and planning processes. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainability indicators; ecosystem services mapping; socio-ecological system; European Alps; spatial analysis; supply-demand mismatches; hot spot analysis; overlap analysis sustainability indicators; ecosystem services mapping; socio-ecological system; European Alps; spatial analysis; supply-demand mismatches; hot spot analysis; overlap analysis
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Schirpke, U.; Egarter Vigl, L.; Tasser, E.; Tappeiner, U. Analyzing Spatial Congruencies and Mismatches between Supply, Demand and Flow of Ecosystem Services and Sustainable Development. Sustainability 2019, 11, 2227.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Sustainability EISSN 2071-1050 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top