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The Sacred Landscape of the “Pyramids” of the Han Emperors: A Cognitive Approach to Sustainability

School of Architecture, Urban Planning and Construction Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano MI, Italy
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 789; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030789
Received: 20 December 2018 / Revised: 20 January 2019 / Accepted: 24 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Sciences in Archaeology and Cultural Heritage)
The so-called “Chinese pyramids” are huge burial mounds covering the tombs of the Emperors of the Western Han dynasty. If we include also the mounds of the members of the royal families, these monuments sum up to more than 40, scattered throughout the western and the southern outskirts of modern Xi’an. They are mostly unexcavated and poorly known, although taken together, they form a fascinating sacred landscape, which was conceived as a perennial witness of one of the most magnificent Chinese dynasties. This sacred landscape is today encroached by the frenetic urban development of the Xi’an urban area. We discuss and elaborate here some of the results of a recent, new satellite-imagery survey of these monuments, highlighting the aspects which may contribute to solutions for sustainable and compatible development within this important ancient landscape. View Full-Text
Keywords: Chinese Pyramids; Han Dynasty; Feng Shui; protection of ancient landscapes Chinese Pyramids; Han Dynasty; Feng Shui; protection of ancient landscapes
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Magli, G. The Sacred Landscape of the “Pyramids” of the Han Emperors: A Cognitive Approach to Sustainability. Sustainability 2019, 11, 789.

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