Next Article in Journal
Bounce Forward: Economic Recovery in Post-Disaster Fukushima
Next Article in Special Issue
Trusting the People and the System. The Interrelation Between Interpersonal and Institutional Trust in Collective Action for Agri-Environmental Management
Previous Article in Journal
The Sustainable Corporate Objective: Rethinking Directors’ Duties
Previous Article in Special Issue
Integrating UAV Technology in an Ecological Monitoring System for Community Wildlife Management Areas in Tanzania
Open AccessArticle

Institutional Innovation for Nature-Based Coastal Adaptation: Lessons from Salt Marsh Restoration in Nova Scotia, Canada

1
School for Resource and Environmental Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
2
Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6735; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236735
Received: 23 October 2019 / Revised: 19 November 2019 / Accepted: 23 November 2019 / Published: 27 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Natural Resource Management)
Sea-levels have been rising at a faster rate than expected. Because of the maladaptive outcomes of engineering-based hard coastal protection infrastructure, policy makers are looking for alternative adaptation approaches to buffer against coastal flooding—commonly known as nature-based coastal adaptation (NbCA). However, how to implement NbCA under an institutional structure demonstrating ‘inertia’ to alternative adaptation approaches is a question that seeks scientific attention. Building on a case study derived from a highly climate-vulnerable Canadian province, this study shows how the entrepreneurial use of scientific information and institutional opportunities helped institutional actors overcome the inertia. Drawing on secondary document analysis and primary qualitative data, this study offers five key lessons to institutional actors aiming at implementing NbCA: (i) develop knowledge networks to help avoid uncertainty; (ii) identify and utilize opportunities within existing institutions; (iii) distribute roles and responsibilities among actors based on their capacity to mobilize required resources; (iv) provide entrepreneurial actors with decision-making autonomy for developing agreed-upon rules and norms; and (v) facilitate repeated interactions among institutional actors to develop a collaborative network among them. This study, therefore, helps us to understand how to implement a relatively new adaptation option by building trust-based networks among diverse and relevant institutional actors. View Full-Text
Keywords: institutional entrepreneurship; polycentricity; bureaucratic autonomy; institutional inertia; sea-level rise institutional entrepreneurship; polycentricity; bureaucratic autonomy; institutional inertia; sea-level rise
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Rahman, H.M.T.; Sherren, K.; van Proosdij, D. Institutional Innovation for Nature-Based Coastal Adaptation: Lessons from Salt Marsh Restoration in Nova Scotia, Canada. Sustainability 2019, 11, 6735.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop