Next Article in Journal
Sustainability in the University: A Study of Its Presence in Curricula, Teachers and Students of Education
Next Article in Special Issue
Opportunities and Challenges for Hurricane Resilience on Agricultural and Forest Land in the U.S. Southeast and Caribbean
Previous Article in Journal
Virtuality Changes Consumer Preference: The Effect of Transaction Virtuality as Psychological Distance on Consumer Purchase Behavior
Previous Article in Special Issue
Assessing Potential Climate Change Impacts and Adaptive Measures on Rice Yields: The Case of Zhejiang Province in China
Review

Crop Vulnerability to Weather and Climate Risk: Analysis of Interacting Systems and Adaptation Efficacy for Sustainable Crop Production

1
United States Department of Agriculture Southwest Climate Hub, Jornada Experimental Range, 2995 Knox Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA
2
Agriculture Science Center at Artesia, New Mexico State University, Artesia, NM 88210, USA
3
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA
4
Department of Entomology, Plant Pathology and Weed Science, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA
5
Natural Resources Conservation Service, 3530 W. Orchard Ct. Visalia, CA 93277, USA
6
Extension Plant Sciences Department, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6619; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236619
Received: 15 August 2019 / Revised: 11 November 2019 / Accepted: 16 November 2019 / Published: 23 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Implications of Climate Change for Ecosystems and Society)
Climate change is increasing mean and extreme temperatures in the Southwestern United States, leading to a suite of changes affecting agricultural production. These include changes in water, soils, pathogens, weeds, and pests comprising the production environment. The aim of this synthesis is to describe the anticipated leading agricultural pressures and adaptive responses, many of which are near-term actions with longer-term consequences. In the semiarid Southwestern United States, climate change is expected to increase water scarcity. Surface water shortage is the leading reason for recent diminished crop yields in the Southwest. Drought and lack of water represent the leading regional weather-related cause of crop loss from 1989 to 2017. Thus, water scarcity has been and will continue to be a critical factor leading to regional crop vulnerability. Soils, pathogens, weeds, and insects are components of the agricultural production environment and are directly influenced by near-term weather and long-term climate conditions. Field crops, vegetable crops, and perennial crops have unique production requirements and diverse management options, many already used in farm management, to cope with production environment changes to build climate resilience. Farmers and ranchers continuously respond to changing conditions on a near-term basis. Long-term planning and novel adaptation measures implemented may now build nimble and responsive systems and communities able to cope with future conditions. While decision-support tools and resources are providing increasingly sophisticated approaches to cope with production in the 21st century, we strive to keep pace with the cascading barrage of inter-connected agricultural challenges. View Full-Text
Keywords: weather and climate; vulnerability; agriculture; adaptation; Southwestern United States; pests; crops weather and climate; vulnerability; agriculture; adaptation; Southwestern United States; pests; crops
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Elias, E.H.; Flynn, R.; Idowu, O.J.; Reyes, J.; Sanogo, S.; Schutte, B.J.; Smith, R.; Steele, C.; Sutherland, C. Crop Vulnerability to Weather and Climate Risk: Analysis of Interacting Systems and Adaptation Efficacy for Sustainable Crop Production. Sustainability 2019, 11, 6619. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236619

AMA Style

Elias EH, Flynn R, Idowu OJ, Reyes J, Sanogo S, Schutte BJ, Smith R, Steele C, Sutherland C. Crop Vulnerability to Weather and Climate Risk: Analysis of Interacting Systems and Adaptation Efficacy for Sustainable Crop Production. Sustainability. 2019; 11(23):6619. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236619

Chicago/Turabian Style

Elias, Emile H., Robert Flynn, Omololu J. Idowu, Julian Reyes, Soumaila Sanogo, Brian J. Schutte, Ryann Smith, Caitriana Steele, and Carol Sutherland. 2019. "Crop Vulnerability to Weather and Climate Risk: Analysis of Interacting Systems and Adaptation Efficacy for Sustainable Crop Production" Sustainability 11, no. 23: 6619. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236619

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop