Next Article in Journal
Students’ Perceived Priorities on Water as a Human Right, Natural Resource, and Multiple Goods
Next Article in Special Issue
The Genetic Structure of the Field Pea Landrace “Roveja di Civita di Cascia”
Previous Article in Journal
Multidimensionality of Sustainable Public Procurement (SPP)—Exploring Concepts and Effects in Sub-Saharan Africa and Europe
Previous Article in Special Issue
Performance and Nutritional Properties of Einkorn, Emmer and Rivet Wheat in Response to Different Rotational Position and Soil Tillage
Open AccessArticle

Extent of Bollworm and Sucking Pest Damage on Modern and Traditional Cotton Species and Potential for Breeding in Organic Cotton

1
Department of Crop Sciences, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 113, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland
2
Plant Physiology, University of Basel, 4056 Basel, Switzerland
3
bioRe Research, bioRe Association India, Kasrawad, 451228 Madhya Pradesh, India
4
Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, University of Agricultural Sciences (UAS) Dharwad, 580005 Karnataka, India
5
Department of International Cooperation, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 113, CH-5070 Frick, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(22), 6353; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11226353
Received: 4 October 2019 / Revised: 2 November 2019 / Accepted: 8 November 2019 / Published: 12 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetic Resources for Sustainable Agriculture)
Resistance against cotton bollworm is one of the main arguments for the use of genetically modified (GM) Bt cotton around the globe. The use of GM is prohibited in organic systems and thus the remunerative value of organic cotton cultivation depends on effective bollworm control. In this study, we investigated the extent of bollworm and sucking pest damage in 68 different hybrid and varietal lines of Gossypium hirsutum and varietal lines of G. arboreum at two different locations with contrasting soil fertility and water dynamics. The damage potential of bollworms was assessed from open capsules at two time points. Sucking pests were assessed at three time points using a scoring method. G. arboreum varietal lines and G. hirsutum hybrids were on average significantly more tolerant than G. hirsutum varietal lines to bollworm under fertile and irrigated situations. For sucking pests, the G. arboreum varietal lines were clearly more tolerant than G. hirsutum hybrids and varietal lines. Since, recently, pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) became resistant against Bt cotton and pressure of sucking pests severely increased, screening of genetic resources and systems-based cotton breeding for bollworm and sucking pest tolerance will improve sustainability of organic and conventional cotton production. View Full-Text
Keywords: Bollworm; organic farming; Gossypium spp.; Bt toxin; smallholder farmer; breeding Bollworm; organic farming; Gossypium spp.; Bt toxin; smallholder farmer; breeding
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Vonzun, S.; Messmer, M.M.; Boller, T.; Shrivas, Y.; Patil, S.S.; Riar, A. Extent of Bollworm and Sucking Pest Damage on Modern and Traditional Cotton Species and Potential for Breeding in Organic Cotton. Sustainability 2019, 11, 6353.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop