Next Article in Journal
The Impacts of Landscape Changes on Annual Mean Land Surface Temperature in the Tropical Mountain City of Sri Lanka: A Case Study of Nuwara Eliya (1996–2017)
Previous Article in Journal
Opportunities to Improve Sustainable Environmental Design of Dwellings in Rural Southwest China
Previous Article in Special Issue
Nutrient Pollutants in Surface Water—Assessing Trends in Drinking Water Resource Quality for a Regional City in Central Europe
Open AccessArticle

Management Scale Assessment of Practices to Mitigate Cattle Microbial Water Quality Impairments of Coastal Waters

1
University of California Cooperative Extension, Novato, CA 94947, USA
2
Point Reyes National Seashore, Point Reyes Station, CA 94956, USA
3
Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
4
Department of Plant Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(19), 5516; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11195516
Received: 12 August 2019 / Revised: 30 September 2019 / Accepted: 2 October 2019 / Published: 6 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Eutrophication and Sustainable Management of Water)
Coastal areas support multiple important resource uses including recreation, aquaculture, and agriculture. Unmanaged cattle access to stream corridors in grazed coastal watersheds can contaminate surface waters with fecal-derived microbial pollutants, posing risk to human health via activities such as swimming and shellfish consumption. Improved managerial control of cattle access to streams through implementation of grazing best management practices (BMPs) is a critical step in mitigating waterborne microbial pollution in grazed watersheds. This paper reports trend analysis of a 19-year dataset to assess long-term microbial water quality responses resulting from a program to implement 40 grazing BMPs within the Olema Creek Watershed, a primary tributary to Tomales Bay, USA. Stream corridor grazing BMPs implemented included: (1) Stream corridor fencing to eliminate/control cattle access, (2) hardened stream crossings for cattle movements across stream corridors, and (3) off stream drinking water systems for cattle. We found a statistically significant reduction in fecal coliform concentrations following the initial period of BMP implementation, with overall mean reductions exceeding 95% (1.28 log10)—consistent with 1—2 log10 (90–99%) reductions reported in other studies. Our results demonstrate the importance of prioritization of pollutant sources at the watershed scale to target BMP implementation for rapid water quality improvements and return on investment. Our findings support investments in grazing BMP implementation as an important component of policies and strategies to protect public health in grazed coastal watersheds. View Full-Text
Keywords: best management practices; fecal coliform; grazing management; indicator bacteria; microbial pollution best management practices; fecal coliform; grazing management; indicator bacteria; microbial pollution
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lewis, D.J.; Voeller, D.; Saitone, T.L.; Tate, K.W. Management Scale Assessment of Practices to Mitigate Cattle Microbial Water Quality Impairments of Coastal Waters. Sustainability 2019, 11, 5516.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop